Tag Archives: Technology

Elements of Culture

As mentioned before, as the description of culture gets broader, the more accurate it becomes. The definition of culture is therefore better understood when the different variables that define it are studied. In order to get a better resolution on what culture really stands for, it is important to understand the ingredients/ elements that contribute to a culture. Some of these elements include Industrial Design, Graphic Design, Architecture, Climatic Conditions, Philosophy, Technology, Economics, Religion, Literature, Politics, Tradition, Ritual, Custom, Human Biology, Physiological Differences and Natural Resources. Lighting solutions in different cultures carry certain unifying elements, and then there are local variations that may arise due to any of the reasons listed above. To begin by establishing a metaphor for our theory of cultural lighting adaptations, we can take the example of the McDonald’s fast food chain and the many iterations of its standard menu that appear around the world.  While the McDonald’s brand and the connection to its standard American menu is maintained in the style of presentation and with the continuation of certain standard items, regional variations are frequently taken into account in order to make McDonald’s more accessible to cultures with specific dietary requirements and restrictions. 

The signature Big Mac burger, well-known to Americans since 1968, has become a veritable symbol of capitalism, used by The Economist as a gauge of purchasing power parity between currencies in what is termed the ‘Big Mac Index’. A standard Big Mac includes a three-part bun (including the middle ‘club’ bun layer), double beef patties, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, and special sauce.  In India, however, you will find the Maharajah Mac, or perhaps a Chicken Tikka Burger, instead.  Since local custom prohibits eating beef, both versions of the Mac here have incorporated lamb or chicken in deference to the local population.  In Pakistan, you would likely find a McChutney Burger, developed using a popular regional type of condiment.  In Japan, a Tsukimi Burger (Moon-Viewing Burger) co-opts the appeal of the yearly autumn tradition of moon-viewing and incorporates a fried egg, which resembles the full moon.  Israel’s McShawarma substitutes the commonly found shaved meat composite for beef patties and is served on local flatbread, rather than a sesame-seed bun.  In some cases, the Mac varies so much that it little resembles the American prototype, but adaptations to the local context make the product more familiar and appropriate, while retaining the brand ‘aura’ of the original.

  • Belgium:   Croque McDo
  • France:   French fries are fried potatoes
  • Hong Kong:  Rice-Fan-Tastic, McRice
  • India:   Maharajah Mac, chicken tikka burger, veg burger (no beef)
  • Israel:   McShawarma, barbecued vs. fried beef patties
  • Japan:   Tsukimi Burger (Moon-Viewing Burger!)
  • Pakistan:  McKofta, McChutney Burger
  • South Korea: McBingsoo (Korean shaved ice)
  • USA:  Super-Sizing

Brain-Shaped Light Installation Feeds on Your Thoughts

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Brain-Shaped Light Installation

Mind and matter meld in Australian artist Laura Jade’s new EEG-controlled installation, Brain Light Project, a boulder-sized light sculpture designed to create a biofeedback loop of light, sound, and thought. In a process developed by Jade, neuroscientist Peter Simpson-Young, and programmer Sam Gentle, the Perspex “neural network” becomes a real-time visualization of visitors’ alpha (meditation), theta (focus and attention), and beta (excitement/agitation) brainwaves. “This experience of seeing your brainwaves represented on an external object in-turn influences the brainwaves that you are creating, which are then represented again on the external object,”

Click HERE to read more about the projects

Article Written by : Beckett Mufson

Image courtesy of : Laura Jade

Source : Thecreatorsproject

Top 10 skyscrapers to be completed in 2015

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OKO South Tower, Russia, by SOM

The building from Moscow-City to make the top 10 is a 352-metre tower by skyscraper veteran SOM, whose portfolio extends from Chicago’s Willis Tower and John Hancock Center, to One World Trade Center and the Burj Khalifa. The OKO South Tower is one of two faceted skyscrapers underway on the site, connected at the base by a transparent crystalline structure. The complex will include a four-star hotel, offices and apartments..

Click HERE to read about other projects

Article Written by : Aidan Imanova

Image courtesy of : from Designmena

Source : Designmena

The World’s Largest Outdoor Art Gallery

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Vivid Sydney

Lighting up the buildings and spaces of Sydney, Australia, is Vivid Sydney, the annual light art event. The 18 day festival, turns Sydney into a wonderland of light art sculptures, and is the world’s largest outdoor art gallery.

Click HERE to see more images

Image courtesy of : Vivid Sydney

Source : Contemporist

Augmented Modelling 3D Printed Jewellery

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3D Printed Jewellery

This augmented modelling tool enables users to touch, poke, rub or pinch geometric forms projected onto their skin to design wearable 3D-printed pieces. Digital research studio Madlab has developed a system that combines projection mapping with depth and motion sensing technologies to create customised jewellery and other items worn around the wrist, Called Tactum.

Click HERE to read more about the Project

Article Written by: Katie Treggiden

GIFS courtesy of : Madlab

Source : Dezeen

Which Projection Mapping software?

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Do you want to start projection mapping…?

The good news is that there are a lot of programs out there that will allow you to do so, but before you put the time in to learning any of them, take a quick peek at the thoughts for just play around in our Tools section and see for yourself. These tools are just the start and if you learn one, then the next step is to start making content for your mappings. What’s great is that a lot of the software used for creating content is cross platform, Mac & PC mainly. Popular tools of the trade include, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, & Cinema 4D, while there are many more, these 4 and others like them should give you a large enough playground to create custom visuals. Additionally, check out OpenFrameworks, Isodora, Max MSP, vvvv, and Processing.

Click HERE to read more about the Project

Article Written by : Cornelius

Photo by : projection-mapping.org

Source : projection-mapping.org.

2015’s Most Exciting Building Projects

Mexicon Airport


Artist’s Rendering for the most sustainable airport in the world Mexico City International Airport

This year will see construction begin on the new Mexico City International Airport, boasting to be the most sustainable airport in the world. The airport will have just one terminal, measuring 470,000-square-meters, which will eventually serve six runways. The entire terminal is enclosed within a continuous lightweight gridshell, embracing walls and roof in a single, flowing form, evocative of flight. The design ensures short walking distances and few level changes, it is easy to navigate, and passengers will not have to use internal trains or underground tunnels – it is a celebration of space and light.

Click HERE to read more about the other Projects.

Article Written by : Matthew Ponsford

Photo by : Artist Rendering

Source : edition.cnn

AWA Lighting Designers Update – April 2015

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Sam Kutesa, the President of the General Assembly cut the ribbon unveiling 'The Ark of Return'.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Sam Kutesa, the President of the General Assembly cut the ribbon unveiling ‘The Ark of Return’.

AWA Project ‘Ark of Return’ Unveiled at the UN Headquarters

On Wednesday March 25 2015, on the United Nations International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and Transatlantic Slave Trade, the ‘Ark of Return’ Memorial was unveiled.

The ‘Ark of Return’ Memorial will be on permanent display at the visitors plaza of the United Nations Headquarters in New York. This memorial honors lives of those who died as a result of slavery or experienced the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade.

AWA is honored be a member of this team, ably led by Rodney Leon of Rodney Leon Architects.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: United Nations Permanent Memorial Committee  

Architect: Rodney Leon Architects

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Niche within the Memorial that holds the human sculpture called 'The Trinity Figure'

Niche within the Memorial that holds the human sculpture called ‘The Trinity Figure’

AWA Project Singapore Chancery Inaugurated

The Singapore Chancery is located in the east side of midtown Manhattan, two blocks away from the UN Headquarters in NYC. This seven-storey building houses the diplomatic offices of the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Singapore to the United Nations.

The scope of our work included all areas of the building, while conforming to pertinent energy regulations and local NYC building codes. The lighting design for the facade was based on our analysis of the architectural intent- highlight dynamism while displaying clear solidity. We grazed the glass of the facade with a linear uplight, while the space behind was uplit with a cove, consistently on each floor.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: Republic of Singapore  

Architect: HOK NY

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Main Entrance at the Singapore Chancery, New York, NY

Main Entrance at the Singapore Chancery, New York, NY

View of Exterior Facade of the Singapore Chancery from across 48th Street, New York, NY

View of Exterior Facade of the Singapore Chancery from across 48th Street, New York, NY

Other News:

Bushwick Inlet Park, Brooklyn
Bushwick Inlet Park has been certified LEED® Platinum by the U.S. Green Building Council.
To see the USGBC score card, please Click Here

Recent Publications
– AWA is featured in Bright 2 ‘Architectural Illumination and Light Installations’.
To read more about the book, please Click Here

– AWA Project Cyber Hub is featured in Mondo Arc India Magazine.
To read the article, please Click Here

Abhay Wadhwa to speak at PLDC 2015
Abhay Wadhwa will speak at the 2015 Professional Lighting Designer Convention (PLDC) in Rome. He also spoke at PLDC 2013 in Copenhagen. Stay tuned for more information about his talk.
To see the PLDC website, please Click Here

Did You Know?
– AWA is able to provide lighting design drawings and details on REVIT, as well as AutoCAD.

– AWA can design and detail custom light fixtures. Please Click Here to see some examples.

– AWA is an AIA Approved CES Provider. Currently, AWA offers 5 courses:

1. What Will 2020 Bring?
2. Light and Health
3. Impact of Culture & Climate
4. LED’s for Infrastructure
5. Light Masterplanning
For more information on these courses, please Click Here.

Artist Uses Gehry’s Concert Hall as Canvas in LA Philharmonic Concert Series

Refik Anadol

The first week of December marked the beginning of the LA Philharmonic’s in/SIGHT concert series. The multimedia series will incorporate video images playing in sync with the performance, creating an immersive new way to experience the music for concert-goers. The first of these performances was the collaborative work of conductor Esa-pekka Salonen and artist Refik Anadol in an audio-visual rendition of Edgard Varèse’s Amériques. Using audio analysis and Kinect motion capture software to record Salonen’s movements while conducting, Anadol has created a stunning set of moving images that capture the very spirit of Varèse’s work. Learn more about this fascinating project, after the break.

Click HERE to read more about the project.

Image provided by: Refik Anadol

Article Written by: Connor Walker

Source: ArchDaily

Visions of America: Amériques / LA Phil / Video Artist Cut from Refik Anadol on Vimeo.

Trends Magazine Features Interview with Abhay Wadhwa

AWA Design Principal recently sat down with Home & Design Trends Magazine to talk about lighting, and how it is not merely a form of illumination but a tool for story telling.

The following is an except from the interview. CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article

You were initially pursuing architecture. What made you suddenly venture into light design?
As a young boy, I loved to create and had a knack for making things and that was the prime reason why I enrolled for architecture at the JJ School of Architecture in 1987. While I was in college, I was not a very focused student and was involved in organizing college shows and fests. There was this one particular students conference of architecture that I was organizing, Which had musicians coming and playing. Just before we were about to begin the man who was in-charge for the light and music needed some help and I volunteered to help him out to set the stage. So I climbed up on the catwalk and was setting up the lights and the moment I finished and the lights went on, I knew I wanted to venture into light design. In those few seconds I knew this is what I wanted to do. It was almost like an instant realization. Now when I look back, I still get goose bumps because I did not realize I was going to stick with it for this long but even back then I knew that I loved it.

What would you call as the turning point in your career?
The turning point would have to be my time at the Lighting Research Center at RPI in upstate New York. I moved to it after my time at University of Southern California. I had one year at USC and that was fun but this was real, a serious boot camp and I was working as a research assistant for my stipend and I was doing an unfunded thesis that was published in technical papers. This is what I wanted to do, I wanted to learn light design right down to the last bit, so that I could really craft it. Mark Rea, the director of my centre who is still a great friend, told me something very special once I finished the programme. He said, “When you came in, you were all over the place and we straightened you out.” Frankly, I don’t disagree with that. I was all over the place. They channelized me. From being a crazy kid who was doing everything, they straightened me out and I have no problem in accepting that because he was and still is one of the best vision scientists in the world. He once said, “If you are a good scientist then you need to design and if you are a good designer you need to know how the technical stuff works. You see that realization, left side, right side of the brain, that’s rubbish. I think both sides of the brain have to work with what I do. In architecture also it’s not about one side of the brain, the left side of the brain. If you’re really creating architecture, you can’t really do it without knowing the technical side. So in that it’s kind of bauhausian, like the Bauhaus School, that you need to know your craft. I have always been fascinated by the German and Japanese system of being apprentices in order to learn your craft.

What parameters do you take into consideration while executing your light design?
When I look at a space one of the first few things one would take into consideration would be of how one would approach it, where the poetry lies, where is the emotional connect and where is the science. Functionality is another important aspect. Also there needs to be a connect with the architecture and how to augment the light with it. So after the initial analysis, we start looking at is the focal points of a project. Light is not merely an illumination. It is a storytelling and an illustrative medium.

 

– Interview with Kamna Malik