Tag Archives: Sustainable

Healthy Lighting: Spotlight on Assisted Living

  1. Understanding of Circadian Lighting
    • Circadian light differs from the generally conceived definition of visual light in that it refers to the affect of lighting on the human circadian system, as opposed to light as a stimulus for the human visual systems.
    • Optimal functioning of the circadian timing system is imperative for good health and can be assisted with proper lighting systems. For appropriate designing of lighting and the associated SPD’s, we depend upon the Circadian Stimuli (CS) that each light offers. Simply defined, the light output or the light levels are not as important in this situation, as the CS factor of each light.
    • Humans have developed an endogenous timing system that optimally synchronizes physiology and behavior (e.g. rest/activity cycles)
    • The timing of our daily biological functions are organized and orchestrated by the master circadian clock. This is hosted by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus
    • The SCN orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology via endocrine and neural pathways.
    • The Circadian System (“circa”, around; “dies”, day) has two fundamental characteristics:
      • Endogenous rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 hours that persists independently of oscillations in external factors such as the light/dark cycle
      • The ability to have its timing shifted by external factors such as light and nutrient intake
    • The importance of the circadian system is exemplified by the observation that circadian disruption leads to an array of disorders (eg; sleep disorders, impaired glucose regulation & obesity) and decreased life expectancy
    • Specifying of dynamic white LED lighting that can be adjusted for higher Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) in the morning and lower CCT in the evening time that can assist in reinforcing the circadian rhythm.

 

  1. Architectural Lighting
    • By understanding how lighting can compensate for common changes that happen to the aging eye, designers can improve the quality of life of older adults in assisted living facilities. Some of those factors where lighting can be used to improve the quality of life:
      • Development of light levels to meet the IESNA recommended levels
      • All lighting to be provided with minimal source brightness. Glare control accessories to be provided where required.
      • The use of dynamic white LED lighting can allow the lighting to respond to the changes in the inhabitant’s environment.
      • Lighting to be provided with sustainable light sources such as LED and CFL to maximize energy efficiency and provide cost savings.
      • The selection of material finishes can increase the ability of the lighting to blend in with its architectural environment.
  1. The Portals of Light

This is a proprietary AWA design solution developed especially for Assisted Living spaces, but this solution also remains pertinent for Special Needs patients (Alzheimer’s, Dementia, Autism etc.)

  • Provides quality lighting design solutions for both circadian and architectural lighting in transition locations (vestibules, foyers, lobbies, etc.). This helps in reducing the jarring impact that change in light levels brings to the residents in Assisted Living spaces. This system comes with a plug-n-play modularity that can be moved easily. It can be used to retrofit existing locations, or used for new construction.
  • By improving the lighting in these transitional spaces, we can provide improved healthcare for all inhabitants, especially those who are not as mobile.

 

Sources:

  1. 2013 Fall; 7(1):60-78. Senior living environments: evidence-based lighting design strategies.
  2. RP-28-07. Lighting for the Visual Environment for Senior Living (ANSI Approved)
  3. Mariana G. Figueiro. 2001. Lighting the way: a key to independence. Lighting Research Center.
  4. M ariana G. Figueiro. 2013. A 24 Hour Lighting Scheme for Older Adults. Lighting Research Center.

Image Credit: Lighting Research Center (A 24 Hour Lighting Scheme for Older Adults)

Healthy Lighting: Spotlight on Patient Rooms

  1. Lighting Design Approach
    • The lighting must be developed as part of a holistic approach to the design of the patient’s room. The lighting design strategy, hardware, and controls must work with all of the other systems to optimize the level of care and the comfort of the patient.
    • Developing this lighting design approach becomes akin to building a kit of parts which can be developed across a hospital or healthcare facility as a whole, thereby reducing maintenance needs and providing a consistent light quality.
  1. Lighting Response to Specific Types of Patient Rooms
    • Typical Patient Room
      • Indirect ambient lighting with low glare light fixtures.
      • Focused reading lights located behind the patient’s head.
      • Low illuminance nightlight to illuminate path to bathroom.
      • Low illumination observation lighting to be provided on either side of the patient bed where electronic recorded keeping takes place.
      • Wet rated, non-conductive, vandal resistant shower lighting to be provided.
    • Examination Rooms
      • Fully adjustable recessed lighting should be provided to be able to examine a full range of patient needs. Fully recessed wipe-down lights are recommended for reducing the spread of bacteria and germs.
      • Provide recessed downlighting:
        • Prevents the light source being seen from normal lines of sight (cutoff angle between 40° and 50° from horizontal).
        • Greatly reduces the possibility of hazards.
        • Makes maintenance and cleaning of fixture easier.
        • Has a high value because it provides high efficiency at a lower cost.
      • Lighting must be provided with a level of redundancy in case of problems or emergency.
    • Clean Rooms
      • Surfaces of light fixtures should be fully recessed with minimal protrusion into room.
      • Light fixtures must be provided with anti microbial finishes.
      • Lighting fixtures must be rated for a clean room environment.
  1. Lighting Technology Needs
    • Provide a fully resilient design that it prepared for extreme events.
    • Lighting to be provided with sustainable light sources such as LED and CFL to maximize energy efficiency and provide cost savings.
    • Provide lighting solutions that increase the user’s connection with nature. Therefore improving the end users mental health; reduce stress and overall improvement of their well-being.
    • High Color Rendering Index (CRI) to be provided to ensure the healthcare physician can accurately evaluate the patient.
    • All lighting to be provided with minimal source brightness. Glare control accessories to be provided where required.
  1. Lighting Control Needs
    • All Lighting to be provided with dimming control that can smoothly dim the lighting to permit low light levels at night to minimize eye adaptation.
    • Patient to be provided with illuminated switches to control certain lighting:
      • Ambient lighting with a recommended lighting level of 10 footcandles (fc)
      • Reading lights with a recommended lighting level of 50 fc
      • Shower lighting with a recommended lighting level of 30-50 fc
    • Doctors/Nurses to control certain lighting
      • Examination lighting with a recommended lighting level of 100-300 fc
      • Nightlight to be on switch or photocell with a recommended lighting level of 3 fc
      • Observation lighting to be provided with dim red amber light switched at the door.

 

Sources:

RP-29-06. Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (ANSI Approved)

 

Creating Sustainable Lighting Solutions

Bushwick Park: project by AWA Lighting Designers

Bushwick Park: project by AWA Lighting Designers

Over time, the architectural community has become increasingly invested in the realization of environmentally sustainable design, and this trend shows no sign of abating. This is a global movement. Sustainable solutions acting in a major metropolis can save building owners significantly on operational costs and cut back in vast quantities on the carbon emissions that would otherwise pervade. And, in other parts of the world, sustainable lighting solutions can make the difference between continuing one’s day, be that education, work or home tasks, or allowing darkness to swallow up needed hours of productivity. Thus, sustainability touches us all.

From low impact materials to energy efficiency, to design for reuse and recycling, there is much to be done. In this context, design connects architects with their partners and consultants, as they work toward their common goal of defining and creating structures that live up to the promise of sustainability. With architecture, technologies, materials and products all merge to create the tangible pieces of lighting design. In their collective application we see the final effects, and the success or failure of strategies and visions. How these pieces are put to use by installers and later by building occupants has tremendous importance on their visual comfort, efficiency performance, function and beauty that must be considered carefully from design inception.

Able to realize the vision of their architectural partners, lighting designers are critical members of the process. For, it is very true that one of the most efficient ways to reduce the overall carbon footprint of a structure is to amend its lighting design with smartly conceived and realized design. And, in the developing world, sustainable lighting nourishes the very essence of life. Thus, although it is just one piece of the puzzle, lighting has an outsized effect on sustainability. Understanding what is possible in this arena only serves to invigorate a practice and encourage new paradigms.

Light triggers critical physiological and psychological responses within human beings. And, since most of us spend the majority of our lives in the built environment, the level and quality of light within these buildings has real implications for our health and wellness. Luckily, today’s architect is armed with sophisticated structural options that allow for more lighting choices than at any point in architecture’s history. In today’s design world, it is no longer a question of whether to design with light in mind, but how to design with light in mind. As we become more aware of light’s implications on our physiological and psychological selves, and as technology affords a greater range of options, architects and their partners are left with an increased repertoire to draw from.  As it relates to health and wellness, the key points to consider are the quality, the quantity and the type of light being delivered within the space. 

Consider first how light comes into play in a health-oriented society. Many functions necessary for growth and well being such as breathing, sleeping, blood pressure, body temperature, appetite, moods, mental acuity, and the immune system are governed by the endocrine system, which is strongly impacted and affected by light, both natural & created by electric sources. There is also evidence suggesting that proper quantities of visually perceived light are needed for healthy functioning of the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that controls motivation, learning, and creativity; the limbic system, the part of the brain that stores emotional impressions of the world; and the motor cortex and the brain stem, the parts of the brain that coordinate body movement and the maintenance of life.

Metal Fabrics – Illumesh

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GKD Metal Fabrics’ Illumesh at the Indemann Project by Maurer United Architects.

GKD Metal Fabrics’ Illumesh controls the span of illumination by the angling of the LEDs. They can be focused on a specific area, or blanket the entire façade. Creative lighting effects can be achieved using individually programmed lighting concepts. Compared to conventional illumination systems, Illumesh offers higher resolution imagery, weather and temperature resistance, and excels as an Internet-operated, high-performance media surface.

Uses & Applications:
– Media facades
– Facades.

Features:
– Durability
– Maleability
– Flexibility.

Specifications:
– Type: Flexible, one direction
– Open Area: 64%
– Weight: 1.30 lbs/sqft
– Nominal Thickness: 0.244″.

Click HERE to read more

Article Written by : From Archdaily

Image courtesy of : From Archdaily

Source : Archdaily

CityTouch – Innovative Remote Lighting Management System to control street lighting

Philips brings new lighting system to Middle East

The smart “plug and play” approach, possible with the CityTouch Ready luminaire.

Philips launched its innovative remote lighting management system, CityTouch, which uses mobile and cloud-based technologies to control street lighting, in the Middle East. The new technology supports today’s vision on sustainability and livable cities. The lighting solution enables cities to save energy, reduces maintenance, and improves safety on streets, due to better visibility, and enhances operational efficiencies. Intelligent lighting is the future of sustainable city lighting. CityTouch connect app not only allows dynamic, intelligent and flexible control of street lighting with dimming control and schedule setting, it also provides the precise amount of light needed at any place and time, saving energy and providing the right level of visibility on the roads.

Click HERE to read more

Article Written by : Designmena

Image courtesy of : From Designmena

Source : Designmena

8 Examples of Caged Architecture

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Tori Tori Restaurant Mexico City, Mexico

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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, London, U.K.

In most contexts, a cage represents imprisonment or an otherwise undesirable restriction of one’s freedom. However, within the realm of architectural design, cages themselves can be freed from the negative connotation of containment: well-designed instances can dramatically enhance the structure or space they contain, framing views, creating visual dynamism, and filtering light to fantastic effect inside and out.
Wrapped in mesh, latticework, timber weaves, or slender piping, here are eight examples — including a 2015 A+Awards Special Achievement Honoree — that show how being caged is not always a bad thing.

Click HERE to read more about other projects

Image courtesy of : From Website

Source : Architizer

2015’s Most Exciting Building Projects

Mexicon Airport


Artist’s Rendering for the most sustainable airport in the world Mexico City International Airport

This year will see construction begin on the new Mexico City International Airport, boasting to be the most sustainable airport in the world. The airport will have just one terminal, measuring 470,000-square-meters, which will eventually serve six runways. The entire terminal is enclosed within a continuous lightweight gridshell, embracing walls and roof in a single, flowing form, evocative of flight. The design ensures short walking distances and few level changes, it is easy to navigate, and passengers will not have to use internal trains or underground tunnels – it is a celebration of space and light.

Click HERE to read more about the other Projects.

Article Written by : Matthew Ponsford

Photo by : Artist Rendering

Source : edition.cnn

AWA Lighting Designers Update – April 2015

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Sam Kutesa, the President of the General Assembly cut the ribbon unveiling 'The Ark of Return'.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Sam Kutesa, the President of the General Assembly cut the ribbon unveiling ‘The Ark of Return’.

AWA Project ‘Ark of Return’ Unveiled at the UN Headquarters

On Wednesday March 25 2015, on the United Nations International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and Transatlantic Slave Trade, the ‘Ark of Return’ Memorial was unveiled.

The ‘Ark of Return’ Memorial will be on permanent display at the visitors plaza of the United Nations Headquarters in New York. This memorial honors lives of those who died as a result of slavery or experienced the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade.

AWA is honored be a member of this team, ably led by Rodney Leon of Rodney Leon Architects.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: United Nations Permanent Memorial Committee  

Architect: Rodney Leon Architects

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Niche within the Memorial that holds the human sculpture called 'The Trinity Figure'

Niche within the Memorial that holds the human sculpture called ‘The Trinity Figure’

AWA Project Singapore Chancery Inaugurated

The Singapore Chancery is located in the east side of midtown Manhattan, two blocks away from the UN Headquarters in NYC. This seven-storey building houses the diplomatic offices of the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Singapore to the United Nations.

The scope of our work included all areas of the building, while conforming to pertinent energy regulations and local NYC building codes. The lighting design for the facade was based on our analysis of the architectural intent- highlight dynamism while displaying clear solidity. We grazed the glass of the facade with a linear uplight, while the space behind was uplit with a cove, consistently on each floor.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: Republic of Singapore  

Architect: HOK NY

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Main Entrance at the Singapore Chancery, New York, NY

Main Entrance at the Singapore Chancery, New York, NY

View of Exterior Facade of the Singapore Chancery from across 48th Street, New York, NY

View of Exterior Facade of the Singapore Chancery from across 48th Street, New York, NY

Other News:

Bushwick Inlet Park, Brooklyn
Bushwick Inlet Park has been certified LEED® Platinum by the U.S. Green Building Council.
To see the USGBC score card, please Click Here

Recent Publications
– AWA is featured in Bright 2 ‘Architectural Illumination and Light Installations’.
To read more about the book, please Click Here

– AWA Project Cyber Hub is featured in Mondo Arc India Magazine.
To read the article, please Click Here

Abhay Wadhwa to speak at PLDC 2015
Abhay Wadhwa will speak at the 2015 Professional Lighting Designer Convention (PLDC) in Rome. He also spoke at PLDC 2013 in Copenhagen. Stay tuned for more information about his talk.
To see the PLDC website, please Click Here

Did You Know?
– AWA is able to provide lighting design drawings and details on REVIT, as well as AutoCAD.

– AWA can design and detail custom light fixtures. Please Click Here to see some examples.

– AWA is an AIA Approved CES Provider. Currently, AWA offers 5 courses:

1. What Will 2020 Bring?
2. Light and Health
3. Impact of Culture & Climate
4. LED’s for Infrastructure
5. Light Masterplanning
For more information on these courses, please Click Here.

Trends Magazine Features Interview with Abhay Wadhwa

AWA Design Principal recently sat down with Home & Design Trends Magazine to talk about lighting, and how it is not merely a form of illumination but a tool for story telling.

The following is an except from the interview. CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article

You were initially pursuing architecture. What made you suddenly venture into light design?
As a young boy, I loved to create and had a knack for making things and that was the prime reason why I enrolled for architecture at the JJ School of Architecture in 1987. While I was in college, I was not a very focused student and was involved in organizing college shows and fests. There was this one particular students conference of architecture that I was organizing, Which had musicians coming and playing. Just before we were about to begin the man who was in-charge for the light and music needed some help and I volunteered to help him out to set the stage. So I climbed up on the catwalk and was setting up the lights and the moment I finished and the lights went on, I knew I wanted to venture into light design. In those few seconds I knew this is what I wanted to do. It was almost like an instant realization. Now when I look back, I still get goose bumps because I did not realize I was going to stick with it for this long but even back then I knew that I loved it.

What would you call as the turning point in your career?
The turning point would have to be my time at the Lighting Research Center at RPI in upstate New York. I moved to it after my time at University of Southern California. I had one year at USC and that was fun but this was real, a serious boot camp and I was working as a research assistant for my stipend and I was doing an unfunded thesis that was published in technical papers. This is what I wanted to do, I wanted to learn light design right down to the last bit, so that I could really craft it. Mark Rea, the director of my centre who is still a great friend, told me something very special once I finished the programme. He said, “When you came in, you were all over the place and we straightened you out.” Frankly, I don’t disagree with that. I was all over the place. They channelized me. From being a crazy kid who was doing everything, they straightened me out and I have no problem in accepting that because he was and still is one of the best vision scientists in the world. He once said, “If you are a good scientist then you need to design and if you are a good designer you need to know how the technical stuff works. You see that realization, left side, right side of the brain, that’s rubbish. I think both sides of the brain have to work with what I do. In architecture also it’s not about one side of the brain, the left side of the brain. If you’re really creating architecture, you can’t really do it without knowing the technical side. So in that it’s kind of bauhausian, like the Bauhaus School, that you need to know your craft. I have always been fascinated by the German and Japanese system of being apprentices in order to learn your craft.

What parameters do you take into consideration while executing your light design?
When I look at a space one of the first few things one would take into consideration would be of how one would approach it, where the poetry lies, where is the emotional connect and where is the science. Functionality is another important aspect. Also there needs to be a connect with the architecture and how to augment the light with it. So after the initial analysis, we start looking at is the focal points of a project. Light is not merely an illumination. It is a storytelling and an illustrative medium.

 

– Interview with Kamna Malik

“Framing The Skyline” Bushwick Inlet Park in LD+A Magazine

Rhythm and Wayfinding- Steplights located in a staggered rhythm visible from over the East River in Manhattan

Rhythm and Wayfinding- Steplights located in a staggered rhythm visible from over the East River in Manhattan

Sustainability was the top priority when designing the new Bushwick Inlet Park in Brooklyn, Aesthetics, however, were not sacrificed for the cause.  We working with Kiss + Cathcart Architects to use wayfinding, patterns and rhythms of light, and pronounced geometric highlighting to illuminate the contemporary 6.2-acre park, community center and large wooden canopy. Integrated LED’s, steplights and concrete-encased downlights define the site, creating a nighttime display that can be seen all the way from Manhattan.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client:    NYC Department of Parks and Recreation
Architect:    Kiss + Cathcart Architects
Lighting Consultant:    AWA Lighting Designers
Local Team:    Starr Whitehouse Landscape ArchitectsRobert Silman AssociatesLangan Engineering
Photographer:    Paul Warchol

CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article