Tag Archives: Shadows

Defining Shadows and Darkness

“It is necessary to return to the point where the interplay of light and dark reveals forms, and in this way to bring richness back into architectural space. Yet, the richness and depth of darkness has disappeared from our consciousness, and the subtle nuances that light and darkness engender, their spatial resonance – these are almost forgotten. Today, when all is cast in homogenous light, I am committed to pursuing the interrelationship of light and darkness . Light, whose beauty within darkness is as of jewels that one might cup in one’s hands; light that, hollowing out darkness and piercing our bodies, blows life into ‘place’.”

– Tadao Ando (1990)

AWA Lighting Designers project: Cyber Hub

AWA Lighting Designers project: Cyber Hub

 

Get Social With Us

GET SOCIAL WITH US

AWA Lighting Designers is on all your favorite social media platforms!
Click the links below for updates on the latest projects and news.
Please stay in touch by following us.
We would love to hear from you.
FacebookTwitterLinkedInPinterestYouTubeVimeo

 

The AWA Movie Channel

Please visit The AWA Movie Channel on YouTube and Vimeo.

The AWA Movie Channel Now Showing

AWA Archtober Event Tonight at 6pm!

AIA CES Course Lecture by Abhay Wadhwa, AWA Lighting Designers
Tonight October 6th 2015 at 6pm
Location: Edison Price Lighting Gallery – 41-50 22nd St. Long Island City NY 11101
Register to attend the Lecture HERE

 

Evocative visual environments require a healthy balance between bright and dark, light and shadow. In a context where the success of a lighting design solution is often measured by the footcandles achieved, uniformity ratios and wattage consumed, are we losing the plot here? Can light truly be appreciated without shadows and darkness? Lack of a better understanding of darkness and shadows can lead to an altogether lopsided relationship with light and light alone. The absence of its contrasting partners in darkness and shadows can have a diminishing effect on the true beauty of light.

This talk examines our lighting zeitgeist and showcases methods of embracing light and dark, while conforming to the relevant code requirements.

AIA CES Course 1 Learning Unit is available for presentation anytime. If you are interested in having AWA provide this CES course presentation at your offices, please email us at newyork@awalightingdesigners.com with your information and dates interested in the talk.

Click HERE to read our latest AWA Newsflash on the Lecture

Location Details:

  • Edison Price Lighting Gallery
  • 41-50 22nd St. Long Island City NY 11101
  • Google Map Directions HERE
  • Closest Subway Lines F, 7, N, Q, E, M, or R

 

 

 

Abhay Wadhwa Speaks on  “Out of Shadows: Darkness in a New light”

AIA CES Course Lecture by Abhay Wadhwa, AWA Lighting Designers
Tuesday October 6th 2015 at 6pm
Register to attend the Lecture HERE

 

Evocative visual environments require a healthy balance between bright and dark, light and shadow. In a context where the success of a lighting design solution is often measured by the footcandles achieved, uniformity ratios and wattage consumed, are we losing the plot here? Can light truly be appreciated without shadows and darkness? Lack of a better understanding of darkness and shadows can lead to an altogether lopsided relationship with light and light alone. The absence of its contrasting partners in darkness and shadows can have a diminishing effect on the true beauty of light.

This talk examines our lighting zeitgeist and showcases methods of embracing light and dark, while conforming to the relevant code requirements.

AIA CES Course 1 Learning Unit is available for presentation anytime. If you are interested in having AWA provide this CES course presentation at your offices, please email us at newyork@awalightingdesigners.com with your information and dates interested in the talk.

Click HERE to read our latest AWA Newsflash on the Lecture

Location Details:

  • Edison Price Lighting Gallery
  • 41-50 22nd St. Long Island City NY 11101
  • Google Map Directions HERE
  • Closest Subway Lines F, 7, N, Q, E, M, or R

 

 

 

Lighting Zeitgeist- Culture, Light Levels and Economics- Part 3 of many

Over time, we have often seen a shift in requirements within a culture or people. In the United States in the 50’s and 60’s, the popular adage was “more light, better sight.” When the OPEC energy crisis occurred in 1973, it required a serious re-examination of light levels and prompted many research excursions to show that we could work as efficiently in much less light.In the last 50 years, as other areas of the world have found prosperity and technology has become more affordable, traditional constructs of light and darkness have been replaced by grossly overlit spaces. The flip in perceptions is best highlighted by the following two quotes taken from two authors from two different parts of the world, quoting 75 years apart in time.

 The eastern world of early 20th century :
• “We Orientals tend to seek our satisfactions in whatever surroundings we happen to find ourselves, to content ourselves with things as they are; and so darkness causes us no discontent, we resign ourselves to it as inevitable.
• But the westerner is determined always to better his lot…..from candle to oil lamp, oil lamp to gaslight, gaslight to electric light – his quest for a brighter light never ceases, he spares no pains to eradicate even the minutest shadow” – Jun’ichiro Tanizaki, in praise of shadows, Japan [1933]  1950s America :
• The popular adage “more light, better sight” dominated our approach to lighting
• Light levels: +1000 lux
 Post-1973 opec crisis:
• Re-examination of required light levels
• Work more efficiently with less light
• Light levels: reduced to 500 lux
 Today:
• “Some judicious use of shadow would help humanize our over-lit lives.”
• Darkness: basking in the dimming of the light
• Murray Whyte, Toronto Star, Canada (2008)
• Light levels: further reduced to 300 lux

Reflexively, as the ‘green’ movement gains momentum, it inspires the search for more efficient lighting solutions, which in turn leads to the development of halogen lamps, and eventually, light emitting diodes (LED’s). The emergence of the tiny, long-lasting, inexpensive LED’s is anticipated to dramatically change the lighting situations in many developing nations where, previously, people relied more on natural light and on planning activities during times when it was available. In the last 50 years, as other areas of the world have found prosperity and technology has become more affordable, traditional constructs of light and darkness have been replaced by grossly over lit spaces. The critique here is clear, that just because technology is affordable and easy to install it doesn’t mean that it should be implemented carte blanche. All technology is susceptible to environmental concerns, and although LED’s do provide superior lighting efficiency in energy of use sense, the current rate of production to fill the gaps aforementioned cannot be sustained in the long term to meet that demand. The reality of the industry is that we have an uncertain supply of both energy and materials which should be addressed not through techno-solving, but rather through simple ethical implementation into the design process, which starts with the simple question “do we really need this?”

The tide of the ‘green’ movements influence in expanding the implementation of ethically sustainable practices into design can be seen through several different certifications and policy initiatives undertaken in recent years. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification formed by the U.S. Green Building Council is the world’s leading certification in sustainable design for architecture in the United States. Developed by the 20,000 or so members of the council, the certification is won by adhering voluntarily to the standards developed by the council for that specific year. The standards evolve and are voted on by the council every year, with the certification goals becoming ever more progressive.

The same progression can be seen through the evolution of the United States congress bill, the 1992 Energy Policy Act (Epact), in which states had to review and consider adopting national model energy standards. In 2007 the Department of Energy updated the policy to improve energy conservation by 3.7%, followed by an update in 2010 to bring the total to 18.2%. The policy debate surrounding sustainability has a large influence on the discussion about light and how we use it. Though we do see change through initiatives like the LEED certification and the Epact, the zeitgeist still turns toward techno-solving as our chosen methodology for escaping our sins. Technologies such as wind power, hydro-power and nuclear power all contribute to the discussion about how we can make our energy production renewable, however the conversation surround how much we should need and how much we are really using is still too quiet.

1950’s OFFICE LIGHTING- MORE LIGHT BETTER SIGHT, 1973 GAS RATIONING IN THE US

ottowa City Counsel

US Gas Rationing 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OUT OF DARKNESS!

“It is necessary to return to the point where the interplay of light and dark Reveals forms, and in this way to bring richness back into architectural space. Yet, the richness and depth of darkness has disappeared from our consciousness, and the subtle nuances that light and darkness engender, their spatial resonance – these are almost forgotten. Today, when all is cast in homogeneous light, I am committed to pursuing the interrelationship of light and darkness. Light, whose beauty within darkness is as of jewels that one might cup in one’s hands; light that, hollowing out darkness and piercing our bodies, blows life into ‘place’.”
– Tadao Ando (1990)

What is darkness, and what is shadow? Darkness is the absence of light, while shadow is the comparative darkness that results from the blocking of light.

As Lighting Designers, several of us use light like our jobs depended on it- literally. I firmly believe that overusing light, often to validate our professional existence, is a professional mistake.

Light depends on darkness and shadow to come to life, and create a harmonious lit visual environment.

 

out of the shadows

 

Intersections: An Ornately Carved Wood Cube Projects Shadows onto Gallery Walls

Created by mixed media artist Anila Quayyum Agha, this elaborately carved cube with an embedded light source projects a dazzling pattern of shadows onto the surrounding gallery walls. Titled Intersections, the installation is made from large panels of laser-cut wood meant to emulate the geometrical patters found in Islamic sacred spaces. Agha shares:

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

Click here to read the original article

Written by: Admin

Source: Colossal