Tag Archives: Modern

The Color Inside

© Florian Holzherr

© Florian Holzherr

From the architect. The Color Inside is a milestone in The University of Texas at Austin’s Landmarks public art collection. Located on the roof of the Student Activity Center, the project arose from the student body’s desire for a peaceful retreat at the Student Activity Center (SAC). The SAC serves as a highly active social and cultural center with amenities that include, amongst others, a ballroom, black box theater, auditorium, conference rooms, and offices for student organizations. Through an in-depth participatory design process, students played a pivotal role in defining the programmatic functions of the SAC and the role it would play on campus. As a result, internationally acclaimed artist James Turrell was commissioned to design a “Skyspace,” one of his renowned inhabitable artworks, in order to offer a space for quiet amidst the dynamic atmosphere of the SAC.

Turrell’s work challenges the traditional relationship between art as object and viewer. Through the manipulation of color and light, the installation radically alters the viewer’s perception of the sky, seemingly bringing it down to the plane of the viewer. His work has no object, no physical presence; instead light and perception are his artistic media. As Turrell has said, “Light is not so much something that reveals as it is the revelation.” By drawing attention to the perceptual mechanisms at work in the act of seeing, he instills the awareness that subjective experience shapes our understanding of reality and the world around us. This perceptual process closely parallels those cultivated by many Eastern contemplative practices, and Turrell himself often likens his work to the Quaker practices of his own youth, in which the act of silent prayer is described as “going inside to greet the light.”

Click HERE to read the full article.

Image Courtesy of: Florian Holzherr

Source: ArchDaily

12 Projects Win Regional Holcim Awards 2014 for Africa Middle East

Eco-Techno Park: Green building showcase and enterprise hub. Image Courtesy of Holcim Foundation

Eco-Techno Park: Green building showcase and enterprise hub. Image Courtesy of Holcim Foundation

Teams from Turkey and Lebanon have received top honors in the 2014 regional Holcim Awards for Africa Middle East, an award which recognizes the most innovative and advanced sustainable construction designs. Among the top three winners is an “Eco-Park” sustainable research and technology center embedded within the terraced, industrial landscape of Ankara.

The 12 recognized projects will share over $300,000 in prize money, with the top three projects overall going on to be considered for the global Holcim Awards, to be selected in 2015.

Click HERE the full list of Africa Middle East winners.

Written by: Karissa Rosenfield

Image Courtesy of: Holcim Foundation

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: Smart Flying Pixels Create a Floating Glow

Flyfire. Project by MIT Senseable City Lab in collaboration with ARES Lab. Image © MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Flyfire. Project by MIT Senseable City Lab in collaboration with ARES Lab. Image © MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Imagine luminaires that could fly and visualise new buildings or individually guide you through space. What would happen if you could even interact with these flying pixels? These concepts could be realised in the near future as the first prototypes and experiments are being introduced. Software-driven LED pixels combined with drone swarm technology provide extraordinary possibilities for inducing new forms of spatial experience. These luminous pixel clouds emerge as digital patterns, but at the same time they emanate a romantic quality with their unique star formations twinkling in the night sky. The first projects have shared a playful note, but laboratories such as MIT’s SENSEable City Lab, ARES Lab and Ars Electronica Futurelab have shown an intriguing future in urban design for guidance systems or envisioning real estate developments, as advances in battery technology and wireless control have opened new perspectives for a life with smart flying pixels.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Source: ArchDaily

World Architecture Festival Announces Day 1 Winners

World Architecture Festival

World Architecture Festival

The 2014 World Architecture Festival (WAF) officially kicked off in Singapore last week, and the first group of award winners were unveiled, with Vo Trong Nghia Architects and AECOM among the 16 announced winners. The winners of the remaining 11 categories will be announced the next day, and the festival will culminate on Friday with the World Building of the Year and Future Project of the Year awards, which will be selected by the festival’s ‘super-jury’: Richard Rogers, Rocco Yim, Julie Eizenberg, Enric Ruiz Geli and Peter Rich. The winners of day 1 were selected from a shortlist that included practices from over 50 countries.

This year’s festival took place from October 1-3, featuring three days of talks, key-note speakers and networking opportunities. With “Architects and the City” as the overarching theme for this year’s main conference sessions, the festival will focus on the contributions architects can make to cities and how they affect – and are affected by – politics, infrastructure, planning communities and technology.

Click HERE to see the winners.

Written by: Katie Watkins

Image Courtesy of: WAF

Source: ArchDaily

Five Buildings Compete to be Named “World’s Best Highrise”

Bosco Verticale, Milan / Boeri Studio. Image © Kirsten Bucher

Bosco Verticale, Milan / Boeri Studio. Image © Kirsten Bucher

Rem Koolhaas, Steven Holl, Jean Nouvel and Stefano Boeri are the masters behind five skyscrapers competing to be crowned the “World’s best.” Chosen as finalists for the 2014 International Highrise Award (IHA), the four practices are in the running for a prestigious title and €50,000 prize.

Award organizers from the City of Frankfurt/Main, Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) and DekaBank at Frankfurt’s Paulskirche will announce a winner in mid-November. The chosen skyscraper will be selected by an esteemed, multidisciplinary jury based on the criteria ranging from future-oriented design and innovative building technology, to the building’s integrative urban development scheme and cost-effectiveness.

“Good architecture requires a willingness to take risks and a desire to try things out. All the finalists took this approach – there can be no innovation without experimentation. Our shortlist comprises three different prototypes of the future,” commented Jury Chairman Christoph Ingenhoven.

CLICK HERE to view full article and view all five of the competing highrises and the jury’s comments.

Written by: Karissa Rosenfield

Image Courtesy of: Brett Boardman

Source: ArchDaily

Trifolium by AR-MA

Trifolium, Paddington Australia - Image by Brett Boardman

Trifolium, Paddington Australia – Image by Brett Boardman

 

Fugitive Structures in an architectural design competition commissioned by SCAF (Sherman Contemporary Arts Foundation) in Sydney, Australia. It is an invited competition, run annually over four years that seeks to showcase emerging architects from Australia, the Asia-Pacific and the Middle East. The brief was to explore the potential of digital pre-fabrication. In 2014, AR-MA were successful in securing the commission.

AR-MA’s design, “Trifolium”, is a fluid, continuous, event-space composed of self-supporting Corian with an interior of curved, black, mirror-polished stainless steel panels. Fabricated like a jewellery box, with over three-thousand unique parts, it is designed to less than 1mm of tolerance.

Click HERE to read more about the project.

Written by: AR-MA

Image Courtesy of: Brett Boardman

Source: ArchDaily

Designers Turn Shipping Container Into A Human-Scale Kaleidoscope

image courtesy of masakazu shirane + saya miyazaki

image courtesy of masakazu shirane + saya miyazaki

 

Japanese designers Masakazu Shirane and Saya Miyazaki immerse visitors to ‘Wink’ in a human-scale kaleidoscope, reflecting them within a maze of geometrically shaped mirrors. Set inside the confines of a 40-foot-long industrial shipping container, the installation unties both architecture and art, and intends to shift traditional structural concepts and ideas about the two disciplines. Not only an experiential creation, ‘Wink’ is also an example of ‘Zipper Architecture’: all of the interior panels are connected by detachable cords, and each singular unit can be opened and closed like a window. ‘this idea could solve global environmental problems’ the designers describe ‘because it is easy to exchange only a part with a zipper.’.

Click HERE to read full article.

Written by: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: Masakazu Shirane + Saya Miyazaki

Source: Designboom

Just Like Taco Trucks, Art Takes to the Road

The Rodi Gallery - Aaron Graham

The Rodi Gallery – Aaron Graham

 

On a recent Saturday, Elise Graham and her 23-year-old son, Aaron, pulled a 12-foot van into a parking spot on West 14th Street in Greenwich Village, swung open the back doors, lowered the aluminum stairs, and welcomed visitors inside their mobile Rodi Gallery.

Around the United States, art is on the roll. Inspired by the success of food trucks, gallery owners like the Grahams, who are based in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., have been taking their show on the road. For the last year, they have traveled to populated spots like the meatpacking district of Manhattan, the Peekskill train station and Astoria Park in Queens. This Saturday, they are parking in the center of Bushwick Open Studios, a three-day festival in Brooklyn.

Click HERE to read full article.

Written by: Alyson Krueger

Image Courtesy of: Aaron Graham

Source: New York Times

Light Matters: Creating Walls of Light

171 Collins Street by Bates Smart Architects and Electrolight

171 Collins Street by Bates Smart Architects and Electrolight

 

Modernism induced a shift in lighting away from luminaires and towards invisible light sources that render spaces in a purer (forgive the pun) light. For the first time, lit walls were used to define rooms and to structure architecture. Today Thomas Schielke explores early prototypes – including Philip Johnson’s Brick House and the Seagram Building – and discusses how their lighting techniques continue to influence architecture today.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Dean Bradley

Source: ArchDaily