Tag Archives: Lighting and Health

WHY LIGHT IS A DRUG

why light is a drug


There are few real-world solutions that successfully combine an understanding of the physiological effects of light with efficiency and aesthetics

As we grow older, our vision is reduced and the amount of light that enters the retina and tells the body what time it is decreases too. Add to that the many hours spent indoors once we’re no longer mobile, and the potential lack of adequate light in care homes, and it becomes clear that there is a gap of light intake that new lighting technology can attempt to fill. Lab tests have found that exposure to moderate intensity light in the morning changes the circadian system, bringing forward the onset of melatonin and therefore altering the sleep-wake cycle. In one study, two hours of light stimulation on two consecutive mornings using a blue short wavelength (470nm) LED advanced the onset of melatonin by over one hour.

Click HERE to read more about the article.

Article Written by: Robert Bain and Nicky Trevett

Photo courtesy of: Cormac Hanley and Andrew Hendry

Source: Lighting.co.uk

Trends Magazine Features Interview with Abhay Wadhwa

AWA Design Principal recently sat down with Home & Design Trends Magazine to talk about lighting, and how it is not merely a form of illumination but a tool for story telling.

The following is an except from the interview. CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article

You were initially pursuing architecture. What made you suddenly venture into light design?
As a young boy, I loved to create and had a knack for making things and that was the prime reason why I enrolled for architecture at the JJ School of Architecture in 1987. While I was in college, I was not a very focused student and was involved in organizing college shows and fests. There was this one particular students conference of architecture that I was organizing, Which had musicians coming and playing. Just before we were about to begin the man who was in-charge for the light and music needed some help and I volunteered to help him out to set the stage. So I climbed up on the catwalk and was setting up the lights and the moment I finished and the lights went on, I knew I wanted to venture into light design. In those few seconds I knew this is what I wanted to do. It was almost like an instant realization. Now when I look back, I still get goose bumps because I did not realize I was going to stick with it for this long but even back then I knew that I loved it.

What would you call as the turning point in your career?
The turning point would have to be my time at the Lighting Research Center at RPI in upstate New York. I moved to it after my time at University of Southern California. I had one year at USC and that was fun but this was real, a serious boot camp and I was working as a research assistant for my stipend and I was doing an unfunded thesis that was published in technical papers. This is what I wanted to do, I wanted to learn light design right down to the last bit, so that I could really craft it. Mark Rea, the director of my centre who is still a great friend, told me something very special once I finished the programme. He said, “When you came in, you were all over the place and we straightened you out.” Frankly, I don’t disagree with that. I was all over the place. They channelized me. From being a crazy kid who was doing everything, they straightened me out and I have no problem in accepting that because he was and still is one of the best vision scientists in the world. He once said, “If you are a good scientist then you need to design and if you are a good designer you need to know how the technical stuff works. You see that realization, left side, right side of the brain, that’s rubbish. I think both sides of the brain have to work with what I do. In architecture also it’s not about one side of the brain, the left side of the brain. If you’re really creating architecture, you can’t really do it without knowing the technical side. So in that it’s kind of bauhausian, like the Bauhaus School, that you need to know your craft. I have always been fascinated by the German and Japanese system of being apprentices in order to learn your craft.

What parameters do you take into consideration while executing your light design?
When I look at a space one of the first few things one would take into consideration would be of how one would approach it, where the poetry lies, where is the emotional connect and where is the science. Functionality is another important aspect. Also there needs to be a connect with the architecture and how to augment the light with it. So after the initial analysis, we start looking at is the focal points of a project. Light is not merely an illumination. It is a storytelling and an illustrative medium.

 

– Interview with Kamna Malik

AWA Project Update 2014: Part 1 of 2

Annual update blue header-updated 7 pm

 

July 17th 2014
Vol. 12.1

Dear Friends,

It was 12 years ago this month at our first studio in SoHo, NY that a journey started, with a simple plan- do great work with integrity, innovate, be happy, and pay your bills. It has been an eventful 12 years with very few regrets. We have been fortunate to work across the globe in 22 countries and counting, with great clients and designers on inspiring projects.

At AWA, we are inspired by the following quote from Woodrow Wilson (1919):
“You are not here merely to make a living. You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget that errand.”

Our heartfelt gratitude to all our friends for their support and continuing patronage over the years.

Stay tuned for another exciting project update in two weeks.

Sincerely,

Abhay Wadhwa
AWA Lighting Designers

Click HERE to read the full update.

 

NMMC

NMMC

 

RMGL Fixture

RMGL Fixture

 

Sheraton Park Chennai

Sheraton Park Chennai

 

Lumen Festival Staten Island

Lumen Festival Staten Island

Mariana Figueiro to Speak at TEDMED 2014

Mariana Figueiro

Mariana Figueiro

Mariana Figueiro, Lighting Research Center (LRC) Light and Health Program Director and Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will speak at TEDMED, September 12, 2014 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. During the talk, she will reveal surprising facts about the effect of light—its presence, its absence, and its patterns—on human health and wellbeing.

Humans need to be exposed to a sufficient amount of light of the right spectrum, for a sufficient amount of time, and at the right time, for the circadian system to remain synchronized with the 24-hour day. Light can be used to improve sleep, alertness, and performance, along with overall health and well-being among the general population, and in populations with rigorous work schedules, such as U.S. Navy submariners and NICU nurses.

One of Figueiro’s flagship projects is the 24-hour lighting scheme for elders, including those with Alzheimer’s disease. The lighting scheme delivers high circadian stimulation during the daytime and low circadian stimulation in the evening, along with nightlights designed to reduce falls. The scheme has been installed in several elder care facilities in New York State with excellent results.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Source: Edison Report

Top Designs from Milan Design Week 2014

fabio novembre‘s ‘we dance’ sculpture for the LEXUS DESIGN AMAZING exhibition

Fabio Novembre‘s ‘we dance’ sculpture for the LEXUS DESIGN AMAZING exhibition

Designboom has compiled images for the Top designs from this years Milan Design Week. We have posted some select images from the article below. Please click HERE to read the full article

Written By: Nina Azzarello

Source: Designboom

Ingo Maurer shows whimsical table lamps which are a nod to Mickey Mouse and Disney.

Ingo Maurer shows whimsical table lamps which are a nod to Mickey Mouse and Disney.

‘melathron’, pure structural engineering applied to lamp design by michele de lucchi for artemide.

‘melathron’, pure structural engineering applied to lamp design by michele de lucchi for artemide.

nao tamura (installation design) / aya nishina (sound design) / takeshi miyakawa (design engineering) installation at LEXUS DESIGN AMAZING exhibition.

nao tamura (installation design) / aya nishina (sound design) / takeshi miyakawa (design engineering) installation at LEXUS DESIGN AMAZING exhibition.

Light Show Puts Spotlight on Mental Health

Mental illness was in the limelight in downtown Halifax on Saturday evening.

A crowd gathered at Grand Parade for a brilliant light show projected onto Halifax City Hall.

The #ShineALight on Mental Health event was held to spark conversation about mental health and to help stop the stigma around mental illness. The light show also plays Monday and Tuesday nights beginning at 7 p.m. and at half-hour intervals until 8:30 p.m.

People with a psychiatric illness often wrongly believe that it is their fault which can prevent them from seeking the help they need, Dr. Nicole Herschenhous told the crowd.

Herschenhous, a psychiatrist, works at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre’s short-stay unit that helps people in crisis.

Click here to read the original article

Written by: Clare Mellor Staff Reporter

Source: The Chronicle Herald

LRC Announces New Light and Health Institute

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will hold a two-day, hands-on seminar May 6-7, 2014, to teach the many ways in which light affects, and can be used to improve, health and wellbeing. Light of the appropriate quantity, spectrum, timing, duration, and distribution can have a profound effect on sleep, alertness, and performance, along with overall wellbeing, and can be used to improve conditions such as jet lag, Alzheimer’s disease, insomnia, and depression.

The goal of this seminar is to provide attendees with the latest research as it can be applied, and the knowledge necessary to improve our modern living environments with energy efficacious, temporally dynamic lighting. This seminar will be of critical interest to those within the field of healthcare, lighting industry professionals, researchers in the biological sciences, facility managers, architects, and others.

Click here to read the original article

Written by: Rebekah Mullaney

Source: Lighting Research Center

Lighting Research Center Launches Light and Health Alliance

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has launched a new collaborative initiative—the Light and Health Alliance—to bridge the science of light and health to practical applications, and to provide objective information based on basic and applied research. The Alliance is led by Dr. Mariana Figueiro, LRC Light and Health Program director and associate professor at Rensselaer.

Light has a profound effect on health and wellbeing, including sleep, alertness, and performance. Humans need to be exposed to a sufficient amount of light of the right spectrum, for a sufficient amount of time, and at the right time, for the circadian system to remain synchronized with the 24-hour day. The LRC is researching light as a treatment for a variety of conditions, including jet lag, Alzheimer’s disease, insomnia and other sleep disorders, seasonal affective disorder and depression. Light can be used to improve sleep, alertness, and performance, along with overall health and wellbeing among the general population, and in populations with rigorous work schedules, such as submariners and night shift nurses.

“Through this collaborative initiative, we will conduct evaluations, demonstrations, and research projects to develop practical devices and applications using light to improve people’s lives,” said Dr. Figueiro. “We will also hold seminars and present at conferences to educate key audiences and advance attention to light and health.”

Click here to read the original article

Written by: Rebekah Mullaney

Source: Lighting Research Center

LRC to Explore Light’s Effect on Greenhouse Crops; Medicinal Plants

Lighting Research Center light and plants expert Tessa Pocock is leading a study in collaboration with Gotham Greens, a New York City-based agribusiness with rooftop greenhouses in Brooklyn, that will research, evaluate, and model LED and high intensity discharge (HID) greenhouse lighting systems to reduce energy and its associated atmospheric pollution, and improve plant throughput and appearance.

The study, funded by a $500,000 grant from New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, will target improvements in energy efficiency and crop production for controlled environment agriculture, such as greenhouses. This research will identify optimal lighting to increase leafy vegetable production using energy efficient LEDs compared with existing HID fixtures.

Light is a powerful regulator of plant physiology, affecting flavor and appearance, as well as nutritional and medicinal value. Each wavelength of light has a different effect on plant physiology. For example, plants grown under blue light are physiologically different than plants grown under red light. And each species of plant has an individual response to different wavelengths as well.

Click here to read the full article

Written by: Admin

Source: IES

Light Therapy Offers Hope for People with Chronic Pain

Doctors in Germany may be about to shed a little light on treating chronic pain. Munichbased pain specialist Prof. Thomas Tolle is beginning a trial using specially designed overhead lighting that imitates a blue summer sky, as an additional therapy for patients with the condition.

“It’s too early to produce results,” he cautions, “but the signs are good. Pain patients who have tried this light therapy have described feeling fortified and stimulated.”

Chronic pain is a huge problem worldwide, affecting about 1.5 billion people worldwide, according to the American Academy of Pain Medicine. It is defined as pain that persists beyond the normal time for healing (which might happen after surgery, for example), or that occurs in diseases such as fibromyalgia (chronic widespread pain of unknown causes).

Click here to read the full article

Written by: Victoria Lambert

Source: The Gazette