Tag Archives: Light matters

Light Matters: Smart Flying Pixels Create a Floating Glow

Flyfire. Project by MIT Senseable City Lab in collaboration with ARES Lab. Image © MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Flyfire. Project by MIT Senseable City Lab in collaboration with ARES Lab. Image © MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Imagine luminaires that could fly and visualise new buildings or individually guide you through space. What would happen if you could even interact with these flying pixels? These concepts could be realised in the near future as the first prototypes and experiments are being introduced. Software-driven LED pixels combined with drone swarm technology provide extraordinary possibilities for inducing new forms of spatial experience. These luminous pixel clouds emerge as digital patterns, but at the same time they emanate a romantic quality with their unique star formations twinkling in the night sky. The first projects have shared a playful note, but laboratories such as MIT’s SENSEable City Lab, ARES Lab and Ars Electronica Futurelab have shown an intriguing future in urban design for guidance systems or envisioning real estate developments, as advances in battery technology and wireless control have opened new perspectives for a life with smart flying pixels.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: MIT Senseable City Lab + ARES Lab

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: The Missing Element At the Venice Biennale

Toilets, at 'Elements of Architecture' at the Venice Biennale

Toilets, at ‘Elements of Architecture’ at the Venice Biennale

 

“Elements of Architecture,” the Rem Koolhaas-curated exhibition at the 2014 Venice Biennale, delved into several remarkable structural as well as technical components of architecture, including floors, walls, doors, stairs and toilets. But why was light missing?

Koolhaas’ focus on the historical retrospective and his interest in the theory of architecture could have offered enlightening perspectives and initiated a long neglected debate on the role of light in architecture. The neglect is especially odd considering Koolhaas’ thoughtful analysis of the influence of lighting in his 1978 work Delirious New York, where he clearly documented, for instance, the “Electrical bathing” of 1890 that extended the beach life at Coney Island or the 1916 Zoning Law that permitted more light to enter into the streets and buildings of Manhattan.

But Koolhaas is not the only famous architect and critical thinker who has placed light in a position of minor importance. Light is often overseen due to its invisible nature. After all, only when material reflects light can we detect it, as Louis Kahn poetically summarized: “The sun was not aware of its wonder until it struck the side of a building.”

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Nico Saieh

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: Louis Kahn and the Power of Shadow

Kahn Looking at his Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery - image by Lionel Freedman

Kahn Looking at his Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery – image by Lionel Freedman

Does shadow have the power to give form to architecture? The increasing number of transparent buildings and LED installations would enforce the impression that light has eliminated the relevance of shadow. But to answer that question, let’s look back to a master of light whose architecture was shaped by shadow: Louis Kahn.

As identified by Leonardo da Vinci, we often encounter three types of shadows: Attached shadow, shading and cast shadow. The attached shadow falls on the body itself – like a cantilever roof causing a shadow on the façade. The second type belongs to bright and dark contrasts, which are inherent to the form and depend only on the source of light, e.g. a ball shaped pavilion, which even under a cast sky shows a darker zone in the lower part. The third, cast shadow, could be the result of a high house generating shadow on the street due to the projection of the building outline.

Kahn´s archetypical forms go back to Greek architecture, which he studied in the 1950s: “Greek architecture taught me that the column is where the light is not, and the space between is where the light is. It is a matter of no-light, light, no-light, light. A column and a column brings light between them. To make a column which grows out of the wall and which makes its own rhythm of no-light, light, no-light, light: that is the marvel of the artist.”

However, light was also a central element in Kahn´s philosophy because he regarded it as a “giver of all presences”: “All material in nature, the mountains and the streams and the air and we, are made of Light which has been spent, and this crumpled mass called material casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.” For him, light is the maker of material, and material’s purpose is to cast a shadow.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Lionel Freedman

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: 7 Ways Daylight Can Make Design More Sustainable

Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Kaap Skil

Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Kaap Skil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daylight is a highly cost-effective means of reducing the energy for electrical lighting and cooling. But architectural education often reduces the aspect of daylight to eye-catching effects on facades and scarcely discusses its potential effects – not just on cost, but on health, well-being and energy.

This Light Matters explores the often unexplored aspects of daylight and introduces key strategies for you to better incorporate daylight into design: from optimizing building orientations to choosing interior surface qualities that achieve the right reflectance. These steps can significantly reduce your investment as well as operating costs. And while these strategies will certainly catch the interest of economically orientated clients, you will soon discover that daylight can do so much more.

Click HERE to read the full article

Image courtesy of:  Mecanoo Architecten

Written By: Thomas Schielke

Source: ArchDaily

United Nations Proclaims an International Year of Light in 2015

The United Nations General Assembly has proclaimed 2015 as the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL2015).

Championed by scientific organizations around the world including SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, IYL2015 will promote improved public and political understanding of the central role of light in the modern world and celebrate significant scientific anniversaries occurring in 2015.

In proclaiming an International Year focusing on the topic of light science and its applications, the United Nations has recognized the importance of raising global awareness of how light-based technologies promote sustainable development and provide solutions to global challenges in energy, education, agriculture and health, organizers said.

Click here to read the original article

Written by: Admin

Source: Digital Journal