Tag Archives: LED

Color Shift

COLOR SHIFT

  • Aging UV exposure may cause plastics to change color
  • Operating conditions and contaminants in the atmosphere may cause color changes

MACADAM ELLIPSE

  • Defines the color point specification of lamps
  • Guidelines for how a person can distinguish between similar colors
  • 2 step ellipse: 2 times the just noticeable difference in color

BINING

  • Measure the output of the LEDs AND sort them into various ranges, or bins, before sale, based on color and flux
  • Size and range of colors of the bins is critical to determine how close a match the LEDs will have to each other and the color variation between units
  • All supplied LEDs must fall within a 2 step macadam ellipse [lm-79 and lm-80 of IESNA]

COLOR RENDERING INDEX

  • Measure of color fidelity
  • Does not account for object color shifts that increase color saturation which can enhance visual preferences, color discrimination ability and visual clarity

COLOR QUALITY SCALE

  • Being developed by the national institute of standards and technology to be considered for the TC 1-69
  • Ability to account for the direction of object color shifts
  • Represents the overall color quality of products for all types of light sources

2020 PARADIGM SHIFT

2020 PARADIGM SHIFT – Past / Present / Future

  • Is there a Paradigm Shift Coming?
  • Changing technologies
  • New materials
  • New policies

PAST

1750 - 2000 timeline

PRESENT

  • Total Penetration of LED Components for the Global Lighting Market is 14.4% [2011]
  • $1.8 Billion/$12.5 Billion

Global Lighting Market

FUTURE

  • 140 lumens/watt 220 lumens/watt
  • Solid state lighting [SSL] will comprise 70% of the global lighting market by 2020

Conventional Lighting / LED Lighting

  • Lack of standards for many components of the led package
  • Reliability of the led package impacts future growth

Manufacturing Costs

Responsive Light Installation is Controlled by Viewer’s Breath

b-reel-creative-prana-light-installation-designboom-02-818x546

The sensitive sensor detects breathing motions

b-reel-creative-prana-light-installation-designboom-01-818x456

LED change color accordingly

The ‘prana’ experience explores the relationship between breath and light, giving visitors the ability the visualize their energy through its impact of 13, 211 individual LED sphere. The word ‘prana’ comes from sanskrit, and refers to a cosmic life force that originates in the sun and enters the body through the breath. studio b-reel creative interpreted that mean with 12 by 12 foot suspended sphere where visitors stand in front of a xethru radar sensor that detects breath. With this data, a custom computer code triggers color shifts and animations that make it appear as if the sphere is breathing with them. Add sounds by one thousand birds heightens the effects, transitioning between each phase of the experience. The team open sourced the code to allow for other artists and developers to create custom animations that can later be incorporated into the installation. The ‘prana’ b-reel creative project was completed designed and built in-house over the course of a year to promote memorable and emotional experiences powered by technology.

Click HERE to read more

Article Written by : Piotr Boruslawski

Image courtesy of : b-reel creative

Source : Designboom

Prana Trailer
from B-Reel

Waterlicht – Floods Museum Square In Amsterdam

Artist Daan Roosegaarde Floods Museum Square In Amsterdam

Waterlicht shows how the Netherlands look like without waterworks.

This inner city square, of almost 8 acres, was virtually placed underwater in Netherlands. Immersive lighting showed what the water level in The Netherlands would look like, if they didn’t have all the waterworks they’re known for. Waterlicht lets the visitor experience the almost forgotten power and vulnerability of water. A virtual flood, innovation is seen throughout the landscape, pushed by the waterworks and the history.

Click HERE to read more about the Project

Article : From contemporist

Photo by : Pim Hendriksen

Source : Contemporist

UN unveils permanent memorial to victims of transatlantic slave trade

UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

Two weeks ago today the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Sam Kutesa the President of the General Assembly cut the ribbon unveiling “The Ark of Return”. The unveiling happened at the UN New York Headquarters where the permanent memorial sits as a memorial to the victims of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. AWA was proud to be there for the unveiling as part of the design team.

Click HERE to read more about the unveiling

Photo courtesy of: UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

Source: UN News Centre

Unveiling of UN Permanent Memorial: The Ark of Return

Wednesday March 25 2015 was the United Nations International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and Transatlantic Slave Trade. We are pleased to announce that the ‘Ark of Return’ Memorial was unveiled as part of the days events. The ‘Ark of Return’ is a memorial that will be permanently on display at the Plaza at United Nations Headquarters in New York. This memorial honors lives of those who died as a result of slavery or experienced the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade. Please see below for some photographs from the unveiling.

 

AWA is honored be a member of this team, ably led by Rodney Leon. 

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: United Nations Permanent Memorial Committee  

Architect: Rodney Leon Architects

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Structural Consultant: Robert Silman Associates

MEP Consultant: Morozov PE

Water Feature Consultant: Delta Fountains

Unveiling of Monument by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Unveiling of Monument by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

 

View of memorial looking east towards the east river

View of memorial looking east towards the east river

View of memorial entrance looking south

View of memorial entrance looking south

"Consider the Legacy" Niche holds a deliberately androgynous human sculpture, called ‘the trinity figure’

Niche within the monument that holds human sculpture, called ‘the trinity figure’

‘the trinity figure’ representing the human spirit and the spirit of the men, women and children of African descent whose deaths resulted from the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

‘the trinity figure’ representing the human spirit and the spirit of the men, women and children of African descent whose deaths resulted from the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

View of memorial looking north

View of memorial looking north

Artist Uses Gehry’s Concert Hall as Canvas in LA Philharmonic Concert Series

Refik Anadol

The first week of December marked the beginning of the LA Philharmonic’s in/SIGHT concert series. The multimedia series will incorporate video images playing in sync with the performance, creating an immersive new way to experience the music for concert-goers. The first of these performances was the collaborative work of conductor Esa-pekka Salonen and artist Refik Anadol in an audio-visual rendition of Edgard Varèse’s Amériques. Using audio analysis and Kinect motion capture software to record Salonen’s movements while conducting, Anadol has created a stunning set of moving images that capture the very spirit of Varèse’s work. Learn more about this fascinating project, after the break.

Click HERE to read more about the project.

Image provided by: Refik Anadol

Article Written by: Connor Walker

Source: ArchDaily

Visions of America: Amériques / LA Phil / Video Artist Cut from Refik Anadol on Vimeo.

Trends Magazine Features Interview with Abhay Wadhwa

AWA Design Principal recently sat down with Home & Design Trends Magazine to talk about lighting, and how it is not merely a form of illumination but a tool for story telling.

The following is an except from the interview. CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article

You were initially pursuing architecture. What made you suddenly venture into light design?
As a young boy, I loved to create and had a knack for making things and that was the prime reason why I enrolled for architecture at the JJ School of Architecture in 1987. While I was in college, I was not a very focused student and was involved in organizing college shows and fests. There was this one particular students conference of architecture that I was organizing, Which had musicians coming and playing. Just before we were about to begin the man who was in-charge for the light and music needed some help and I volunteered to help him out to set the stage. So I climbed up on the catwalk and was setting up the lights and the moment I finished and the lights went on, I knew I wanted to venture into light design. In those few seconds I knew this is what I wanted to do. It was almost like an instant realization. Now when I look back, I still get goose bumps because I did not realize I was going to stick with it for this long but even back then I knew that I loved it.

What would you call as the turning point in your career?
The turning point would have to be my time at the Lighting Research Center at RPI in upstate New York. I moved to it after my time at University of Southern California. I had one year at USC and that was fun but this was real, a serious boot camp and I was working as a research assistant for my stipend and I was doing an unfunded thesis that was published in technical papers. This is what I wanted to do, I wanted to learn light design right down to the last bit, so that I could really craft it. Mark Rea, the director of my centre who is still a great friend, told me something very special once I finished the programme. He said, “When you came in, you were all over the place and we straightened you out.” Frankly, I don’t disagree with that. I was all over the place. They channelized me. From being a crazy kid who was doing everything, they straightened me out and I have no problem in accepting that because he was and still is one of the best vision scientists in the world. He once said, “If you are a good scientist then you need to design and if you are a good designer you need to know how the technical stuff works. You see that realization, left side, right side of the brain, that’s rubbish. I think both sides of the brain have to work with what I do. In architecture also it’s not about one side of the brain, the left side of the brain. If you’re really creating architecture, you can’t really do it without knowing the technical side. So in that it’s kind of bauhausian, like the Bauhaus School, that you need to know your craft. I have always been fascinated by the German and Japanese system of being apprentices in order to learn your craft.

What parameters do you take into consideration while executing your light design?
When I look at a space one of the first few things one would take into consideration would be of how one would approach it, where the poetry lies, where is the emotional connect and where is the science. Functionality is another important aspect. Also there needs to be a connect with the architecture and how to augment the light with it. So after the initial analysis, we start looking at is the focal points of a project. Light is not merely an illumination. It is a storytelling and an illustrative medium.

 

– Interview with Kamna Malik

Project Update – The Ark of Return: Lest We Forget

We are pleased to share that construction is set to begin on the ‘Ark of Return’, a memorial that will be permanently on display at the Plaza at United Nations Headquarters in New York. This memorial will be erected in memory of the victims of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. Please see below for renderings of the project at night.

 

AWA is honored be a member of this team, ably led by Rodney Leon. 

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: United Nations Permanent Memorial Committee  

Architect: Rodney Leon Architects

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Structural Consultant: Robert Silman Associates

MEP Consultant: Morozov PE

Water Feature Consultant: Delta Fountains

Renderings: Rodney Leon Architects

Select Press Coverage:

UNStories: The Ark of Return: Let We Forget 

UN: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery

UN News Centre: Telling the stories of 15 million slaves in a UN memorial

UNESCO: ‘The Ark of Return’ Press Release

Jamaica Observer: Monument to slavery now set for 2015 unveiling at UN

 

Aerial View of the Memorial

Aerial View of the Memorial

 

View of the Memorial from First Avenue

View of the Memorial from First Avenue

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Hundreds of Interactive Butterflies Change Colors and Patterns by Smartphone

On the Wings of Freedom

On the Wings of Freedom

For the Amsterdam Light Festival, which goes on from now through January 2015, Italian design studio Aether & Hemera have created On the Wings of Freedom, a radiant cloud of hundreds of butterflies that hover above the ground. The dazzling installation can be found along the walking route of the festival, at Wertheimpark. Visitors with a smartphone are welcome to change the lighting effects which means they can manipulate the colors and patterns of light.

The butterflies represent metamorphosis and freedom across all cultures. Essentially, this installation is about the transformation of a city, in this case, Amsterdam. As they state, “The city is a place where people can continuously be inspired, not only culturally but also socially; a place for ongoing change and progress. On the Wings of Freedom symbolizes this potential change and evolution.

“With our installation’s dynamic waves of colors we wanted to celebrate Amsterdam’s bubbles and buzzes of activities, thoughts and interactions.”

“The joyous flapping creatures in the Wertheimpark are not just a source of beauty and enjoyment, but also a request: keep the change coming. It’s what Amsterdam is all about. It’s been said that a butterfly can cause a storm. Leave it to these butterflies to cause a hurricane of light and creativity.”

Click HERE to see more images of the project.

Article Written by: Alice Yoo

Source: My Modern Met