Tag Archives: Healthy Lighting

AWA NEWSFLASH: Abhay Wadhwa to Speak at AIA Miami Design+Technology Expo

Abhay Wadhwa to speak at AIA Miami’s Design + Technology Expo on Friday, September 23 2016.
He will be speaking on “The Unspoken Relationship Between Light and Health”. An extract from his talk:

“Light triggers critical physiological and psychological responses within human beings. The level and quality of light within the built environment has real implications on our health and wellness. As we become more aware of light’s implications on our health, and as technology affords us a greater range of options, we can develop a larger repertoire of design tools with which to positively impact our health and wellness.”

If you would like to register for the Expo, please click HERE.

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AWA Healthy Lighting Studio
The Healthy Lighting Studio is located at AWA’s New York location, and is led by AWA’s Design Principal Abhay Wadhwa. Over the past 14 years, AWA has completed several healthcare projects, and the endeavor has always been to utilize the uplifting nuances of light to create evocative and healing spaces. We have focused intently on using light and lighting to improve the health and well-being of people, especially in healthcare and recuperative environments. If you would like more information on our Healthy Lighting Studio services, please contact us at newyork@awalightingdesigners.com or feel free to call Abhay directly.

Healthy Lighting Studio Banner 2016

AWA NEWSFLASH: AWA Launches New Vertical – The Healthy Lighting Studio

The new Healthy Lighting Studio focuses on improving health and well-being with lighting. The Healthy Lighting Studio is located at AWA’s New York location, and is led by AWA’s Design Principal Abhay Wadhwa. The new vertical is an addition to the existing verticals at the AWA studios.

Why?
Over the past 14 years, AWA has completed several healthcare projects, and the endeavor has always been to utilize the uplifting nuances of light to create evocative and healing spaces. We have focused intently on using light and lighting to improve the health and well-being of people, especially in healthcare and recuperative environments.

Because of our several ongoing projects and our personal interest in this topic, we have started a new design and research vertical at our studio, where we will continue to develop mainstream design applications for the greater public good. The intent is to provide a holistic response for the visual environment, providing services such as lighting design, color therapy design, visual graphics & way-finding design, lighting technology retrofit upgrades, and EMF/RFI analysis.

Project Types:

  • Special Needs
  • Assisted Living
  • Hospital Patient Rooms
  • Recuperation Centers
  • Wellness Spas

If you would like more information on our services please contact us at newyork@awalightingdesigners.com or by calling Abhay directly.

View from Entrance Lobby at Medicity Medanta - AWA uses backlighting for stone wall and indirect lighting for circulation

View from Entrance Lobby at Medicity Medanta – AWA uses backlighting for stone wall and indirect lighting for circulation

 

 

A 24-hour lighting for improving life for Older Adults, undertaken by the Lighting Research Center

A 24-hour lighting for improving life for Older Adults, undertaken by the Lighting Research Center

Healthy Lighting: Spotlight on Assisted Living

  1. Understanding of Circadian Lighting
    • Circadian light differs from the generally conceived definition of visual light in that it refers to the affect of lighting on the human circadian system, as opposed to light as a stimulus for the human visual systems.
    • Optimal functioning of the circadian timing system is imperative for good health and can be assisted with proper lighting systems. For appropriate designing of lighting and the associated SPD’s, we depend upon the Circadian Stimuli (CS) that each light offers. Simply defined, the light output or the light levels are not as important in this situation, as the CS factor of each light.
    • Humans have developed an endogenous timing system that optimally synchronizes physiology and behavior (e.g. rest/activity cycles)
    • The timing of our daily biological functions are organized and orchestrated by the master circadian clock. This is hosted by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus
    • The SCN orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology via endocrine and neural pathways.
    • The Circadian System (“circa”, around; “dies”, day) has two fundamental characteristics:
      • Endogenous rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 hours that persists independently of oscillations in external factors such as the light/dark cycle
      • The ability to have its timing shifted by external factors such as light and nutrient intake
    • The importance of the circadian system is exemplified by the observation that circadian disruption leads to an array of disorders (eg; sleep disorders, impaired glucose regulation & obesity) and decreased life expectancy
    • Specifying of dynamic white LED lighting that can be adjusted for higher Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) in the morning and lower CCT in the evening time that can assist in reinforcing the circadian rhythm.

 

  1. Architectural Lighting
    • By understanding how lighting can compensate for common changes that happen to the aging eye, designers can improve the quality of life of older adults in assisted living facilities. Some of those factors where lighting can be used to improve the quality of life:
      • Development of light levels to meet the IESNA recommended levels
      • All lighting to be provided with minimal source brightness. Glare control accessories to be provided where required.
      • The use of dynamic white LED lighting can allow the lighting to respond to the changes in the inhabitant’s environment.
      • Lighting to be provided with sustainable light sources such as LED and CFL to maximize energy efficiency and provide cost savings.
      • The selection of material finishes can increase the ability of the lighting to blend in with its architectural environment.
  1. The Portals of Light

This is a proprietary AWA design solution developed especially for Assisted Living spaces, but this solution also remains pertinent for Special Needs patients (Alzheimer’s, Dementia, Autism etc.)

  • Provides quality lighting design solutions for both circadian and architectural lighting in transition locations (vestibules, foyers, lobbies, etc.). This helps in reducing the jarring impact that change in light levels brings to the residents in Assisted Living spaces. This system comes with a plug-n-play modularity that can be moved easily. It can be used to retrofit existing locations, or used for new construction.
  • By improving the lighting in these transitional spaces, we can provide improved healthcare for all inhabitants, especially those who are not as mobile.

 

Sources:

  1. 2013 Fall; 7(1):60-78. Senior living environments: evidence-based lighting design strategies.
  2. RP-28-07. Lighting for the Visual Environment for Senior Living (ANSI Approved)
  3. Mariana G. Figueiro. 2001. Lighting the way: a key to independence. Lighting Research Center.
  4. M ariana G. Figueiro. 2013. A 24 Hour Lighting Scheme for Older Adults. Lighting Research Center.

Image Credit: Lighting Research Center (A 24 Hour Lighting Scheme for Older Adults)

Healthy Lighting: Spotlight on Patient Rooms

  1. Lighting Design Approach
    • The lighting must be developed as part of a holistic approach to the design of the patient’s room. The lighting design strategy, hardware, and controls must work with all of the other systems to optimize the level of care and the comfort of the patient.
    • Developing this lighting design approach becomes akin to building a kit of parts which can be developed across a hospital or healthcare facility as a whole, thereby reducing maintenance needs and providing a consistent light quality.
  1. Lighting Response to Specific Types of Patient Rooms
    • Typical Patient Room
      • Indirect ambient lighting with low glare light fixtures.
      • Focused reading lights located behind the patient’s head.
      • Low illuminance nightlight to illuminate path to bathroom.
      • Low illumination observation lighting to be provided on either side of the patient bed where electronic recorded keeping takes place.
      • Wet rated, non-conductive, vandal resistant shower lighting to be provided.
    • Examination Rooms
      • Fully adjustable recessed lighting should be provided to be able to examine a full range of patient needs. Fully recessed wipe-down lights are recommended for reducing the spread of bacteria and germs.
      • Provide recessed downlighting:
        • Prevents the light source being seen from normal lines of sight (cutoff angle between 40° and 50° from horizontal).
        • Greatly reduces the possibility of hazards.
        • Makes maintenance and cleaning of fixture easier.
        • Has a high value because it provides high efficiency at a lower cost.
      • Lighting must be provided with a level of redundancy in case of problems or emergency.
    • Clean Rooms
      • Surfaces of light fixtures should be fully recessed with minimal protrusion into room.
      • Light fixtures must be provided with anti microbial finishes.
      • Lighting fixtures must be rated for a clean room environment.
  1. Lighting Technology Needs
    • Provide a fully resilient design that it prepared for extreme events.
    • Lighting to be provided with sustainable light sources such as LED and CFL to maximize energy efficiency and provide cost savings.
    • Provide lighting solutions that increase the user’s connection with nature. Therefore improving the end users mental health; reduce stress and overall improvement of their well-being.
    • High Color Rendering Index (CRI) to be provided to ensure the healthcare physician can accurately evaluate the patient.
    • All lighting to be provided with minimal source brightness. Glare control accessories to be provided where required.
  1. Lighting Control Needs
    • All Lighting to be provided with dimming control that can smoothly dim the lighting to permit low light levels at night to minimize eye adaptation.
    • Patient to be provided with illuminated switches to control certain lighting:
      • Ambient lighting with a recommended lighting level of 10 footcandles (fc)
      • Reading lights with a recommended lighting level of 50 fc
      • Shower lighting with a recommended lighting level of 30-50 fc
    • Doctors/Nurses to control certain lighting
      • Examination lighting with a recommended lighting level of 100-300 fc
      • Nightlight to be on switch or photocell with a recommended lighting level of 3 fc
      • Observation lighting to be provided with dim red amber light switched at the door.

 

Sources:

RP-29-06. Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (ANSI Approved)