Tag Archives: Energy

Vortices of Energy

Meridians

  • Traditional Chinese medicine
  • A path through which the life energy “QI” flows to the body
  • 12 principal meridians divided into YIN and YAN groups, each associated with a region of the body

Meridians

Chakras

  • In Hindu metaphysical tradition, chakras are centers of life force, or vital energy
  • Respond to vital points on the physical body
  • Used in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism

Chakras

Lighting Control Systems

A lighting control system consists of a device that controls electric lighting and devices, alone or as part of a daylight harvesting system, for a public, commercial, or residential building or property, or the theater. Lighting control systems are used for working, aesthetic, and security illumination for interior, exterior, and landscape lighting, and theater stage lighting productions. They are often part of sustainable architecture and lighting design for integrated green building energy conservation programs.

Lighting control systems, with an embedded processor or industrial computer device, usually include one or more portable or mounted keypad or touch screen console interfaces, and can include mobile phone operation. These control interfaces allow users the ability to remotely toggle (on-off) power to individual or groups of lights (and ceiling fans and other devices), operate dimmers, and pre-program space lighting levels. A major advantage of a lighting control system over conventional individual switching is the ability to control any light, group of lights, or all lights in a building from a single user interface device. Any light or device can be controlled from any location. This ability to control multiple light sources from a user device allows complex “light scenes” to be created. A room may have multiple scenes available, each one created for different activities in the room. A lighting scene can create dramatic changes in atmosphere, for a residence or the stage, by a simple button press. In landscape design, in addition to landscape lighting, fountain pumps, water spa heating, swimming pool covers, motorized gates, and outdoor fireplace ignition; can be remotely or automatically controlled.

Lighting control systems provide the ability to automatically power a device based on:

• Chronological time (time of day)

• Astronomical time (sunrise/sunset)

• Room or outdoor space occupancy (motion sensors)

• Presence of daylight (lighting costs and energy conservation,and daylight harvesting)

• Events

• Alarm conditions

• Program logic (any combination of events)

Chronological time is a specific time of day as pre-set timers use. Astronomical times includes sunrise, sunset, a specific day of the week or days in a month or year. Room occupancy might be determined with motion detectors or RFID tags, and is part of security and energy conservation programs. Artificial lighting energy use can be reduced by automatically dimming and/or switching electric lights in response to the level of daylighting, a technology known as daylight harvesting. Mobile phone operated controls can turn on a basic group of circulation—safety fixtures serving exterior—interior locations on approach, or to preheat a “water spa” in advance of returning. Events might include special fixtures for social occasions and holiday lighting, or overall brightness for cleaning. Alarm conditions can include doors opening and motion detected in a protected area, or manual “panic buttons-all lights on” for occupants sensing a possible intrusion. Program logic can tie all of the above elements together using constructs such as if-then-else statements and logical operators.

Architecture Spotlight: Abhay Wadhwa

-By Ben Hinson-

Abhay Wadhwa, aka “The Poet of Light” is a very interesting personality in the world of architecture and design. His formative years in the 70s and 80s were spent in India, and if you had told him then that today he would be heading up his own successful architectural lighting firm in New York City, chances are he would not have believed you. But yet here he is, his firm, AWA Lighting Designers firmly established in Brooklyn. And this specialist has certainly made a name for himself: his work has been featured across India, New York City, Dubai, New Jersey, Hong Kong and Saudi Arabia. Check out the below pictures that offer a sample of his achievements to date:

Brigade gateway – bangalore india


Holland tunnel – New Jersey


Nets go @ seoul plaza – south korea

icici bank – india

Trained as an architect, he discovered his passion for lighting design while working part-time at a theater gig during his sophomore year in architecture school. He founded AWA Lighting Designers in 2002, and since then has transformed his startup into a respected global brand. Abhay likes to focus on projects with high design content, projects that are challenging, projects that can make people happier and use lighting to influence moods. His economic approach to lighting design is to be cost effective and energy efficient. His aesthetic approach is a poetic one, that involves enhancing specific focus points and revealing subtle architectural details and rhythms. And his eclectic nature is evident even in conversation. When I spoke with Abhay for this article, we discussed topics ranging from the intricacies of lighting design (lighting levels, lighting litigation, lighting across different cultures) to history, anthropology and economics across Asia, the Caribbean and Europe. He is quite a unique character, and I appreciated that about him. If I was a contractor/builder evaluating an architectural service provider, besides having a Big Picture, intimate understanding of the project, I would also want someone who took into serious consideration the market, cultural and social forces; past and present, at play, and for that Mr. Abhay Wadhwa has my salute. Talking with him was definitely a treat. Be sure to check out his firm, AWA Lighting Designers for more samples of their work. I’ll leave you with the below video of Abhay speaking at the 2015 Professional Lighting Designers Conference. Enjoy.

View the full article here.

Metal Fabrics – Illumesh

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GKD Metal Fabrics’ Illumesh at the Indemann Project by Maurer United Architects.

GKD Metal Fabrics’ Illumesh controls the span of illumination by the angling of the LEDs. They can be focused on a specific area, or blanket the entire façade. Creative lighting effects can be achieved using individually programmed lighting concepts. Compared to conventional illumination systems, Illumesh offers higher resolution imagery, weather and temperature resistance, and excels as an Internet-operated, high-performance media surface.

Uses & Applications:
– Media facades
– Facades.

Features:
– Durability
– Maleability
– Flexibility.

Specifications:
– Type: Flexible, one direction
– Open Area: 64%
– Weight: 1.30 lbs/sqft
– Nominal Thickness: 0.244″.

Click HERE to read more

Article Written by : From Archdaily

Image courtesy of : From Archdaily

Source : Archdaily

Milan Expo 2015: b720 Designs Greenhouse-Inspired Pavilion for Spain

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Greenhouse-Inspired Pavilion for Spain

Barcelona’s b720 arquitectos has designed a greenhouse-inspired pavilion to represent Spain at the 2015 Milan Expo. Representing a “fusion” of Spain’s gastronomic tradition and innovation, the portico-like structure will be divided into two halves and united by a repetitious form. The Spanish gastronomy reputation, based on the balanced combination of tradition and innovation, makes it a global reference on international markets. This fact has a relevant role on the generation of the pavilion, creating two separated areas – and applying different tectonics to them according to this duality described the architects.

Click HERE to read more about the Project

Article Written by : Rosenfield Karissa

Photo by : © b720 Arquitectos

Source : archdaily

2015’s Most Exciting Building Projects

Mexicon Airport


Artist’s Rendering for the most sustainable airport in the world Mexico City International Airport

This year will see construction begin on the new Mexico City International Airport, boasting to be the most sustainable airport in the world. The airport will have just one terminal, measuring 470,000-square-meters, which will eventually serve six runways. The entire terminal is enclosed within a continuous lightweight gridshell, embracing walls and roof in a single, flowing form, evocative of flight. The design ensures short walking distances and few level changes, it is easy to navigate, and passengers will not have to use internal trains or underground tunnels – it is a celebration of space and light.

Click HERE to read more about the other Projects.

Article Written by : Matthew Ponsford

Photo by : Artist Rendering

Source : edition.cnn

Spiralling underwater cities could make oceans inhabitable by 2030

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Underwater cities with infrastructure networks

Underwater cities with infrastructure networks spiralling down into the depths of the oceans could be a reality as soon as 2030. Micro-organisms could be used to turn carbon-dioxide into methane according to a Tokyo-based company. This would fuel power generators along the spiral, which would also take advantage of differences in seawater temperature to create additional energy.The concept was developed in partnership with Tokyo University and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (Jamstec)

Click HERE to read more about the project.

Article Written by: Amy Frearson.

Photo courtesy of: Shimizu Corp.

Source: Dezeen

“Framing The Skyline” Bushwick Inlet Park in LD+A Magazine

Rhythm and Wayfinding- Steplights located in a staggered rhythm visible from over the East River in Manhattan

Rhythm and Wayfinding- Steplights located in a staggered rhythm visible from over the East River in Manhattan

Sustainability was the top priority when designing the new Bushwick Inlet Park in Brooklyn, Aesthetics, however, were not sacrificed for the cause.  We working with Kiss + Cathcart Architects to use wayfinding, patterns and rhythms of light, and pronounced geometric highlighting to illuminate the contemporary 6.2-acre park, community center and large wooden canopy. Integrated LED’s, steplights and concrete-encased downlights define the site, creating a nighttime display that can be seen all the way from Manhattan.

PROJECT TEAM:

Client:    NYC Department of Parks and Recreation
Architect:    Kiss + Cathcart Architects
Lighting Consultant:    AWA Lighting Designers
Local Team:    Starr Whitehouse Landscape ArchitectsRobert Silman AssociatesLangan Engineering
Photographer:    Paul Warchol

CLICK HERE to download full PDF Article

UN Global Efficient Lighting Forum held in Beijing

Beijing hosted a global energy-saving forum from Monday to Tuesday, bringing together governments, the private sector, financial institutions and international agencies to reaffirm their commitment to implementing a worldwide transition to energy efficient lighting.

The Global Efficient Lighting Forum was spearheaded by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and inspired by the United Nations Secretary General’s Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) initiative, which prioritized lighting as one of its five energy efficiency accelerators. Among the various measures, investing in efficient lighting instead of building new power plants is the cleanest, fastest and most cost-effective way to reduce climate change, the UNEP said.

UNEP estimates that replacing all inefficient on-grid lighting globally with innovative, energy-efficient alternatives would result in over 1,000 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity savings annually, which is equivalent to the annual use of India and the United Kingdom combined. This electricity savings is equivalent to over 120 billion U.S dollars in avoided electricity bills and the reduction of over 530 million tonnes of CO2 annually.

LED lighting and digital control systems are revolutionizing lighting services by delivering improved levels of energy efficiency to all sectors. If there were a global transition to LED, it would reduce electricity consumption by 1550 TWh worldwide, which could provide 1.5 billion household with electricity. Representatives attending the forum have reached an agreement to double the global rate of energy efficiency and make sustainable energy for all a reality by 2030.

The forum was hosted by the Global Efficient Lighting Centre (GELC)-UNEP Collaborating Centre, with support from China’s National Development and Reform Commission, Industry and Information Technology Ministry, and the government of Beijing Municipality.

Click HERE read the original article

Article Editor by: Du Mingming、Yao Chun

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)-Global Environment Facility (GEF): Website

Source: People’s Daily

How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future

Animal Printheads Biomimicry - photo by John Becker

Animal Printheads Biomimicry – photo by John Becker

 

Biomimicry is quickly emerging as one of the next architectural frontiers. New manufacturing processes such as 3D printing, coupled with the drive to make buildings more environmentally sustainable, have led to a wave of projects that are derived from natural phenomena or even constructed with biological materials. A recent example of this trend is “Hy-Fi,” this summer’s MoMA PS1 design that is constructed of organic and compostable eco-bricks. Other projects such as MIT Media Lab’s Silk Pavilion have taken biological innovation a step further by actually using a biometric construction processes – around 6,500 silkworms wove the Silk Pavilion’s membrane. “Animal Printheads,” asGeoff Manaugh calls them in his article “Architecture-By-Bee and Other Animal Printheads,” have already proven to be a viable part of the manufacturing process in art, and perhaps in the future, the built environment as well. But what happens when humans engineer animals to 3D print other materials?

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Evan Rawn

Image Courtesy of: John Becker

Source: ArchDaily