Category Archives: Architecture

WE ARE HIRING

We are seeking bright stars to join our New Delhi studio. If you are a creative, intelligent, and sincere lighting design professional with an architectural, interior design, electrical or theater background, we will like to hear from you.

Please email your resume and portfolio of sample work to newdelhi@awalightingdesigners.com. Please make sure you have the required skills & disposition for this job before you send in your resume

Color Shift

COLOR SHIFT

  • Aging UV exposure may cause plastics to change color
  • Operating conditions and contaminants in the atmosphere may cause color changes

MACADAM ELLIPSE

  • Defines the color point specification of lamps
  • Guidelines for how a person can distinguish between similar colors
  • 2 step ellipse: 2 times the just noticeable difference in color

BINING

  • Measure the output of the LEDs AND sort them into various ranges, or bins, before sale, based on color and flux
  • Size and range of colors of the bins is critical to determine how close a match the LEDs will have to each other and the color variation between units
  • All supplied LEDs must fall within a 2 step macadam ellipse [lm-79 and lm-80 of IESNA]

COLOR RENDERING INDEX

  • Measure of color fidelity
  • Does not account for object color shifts that increase color saturation which can enhance visual preferences, color discrimination ability and visual clarity

COLOR QUALITY SCALE

  • Being developed by the national institute of standards and technology to be considered for the TC 1-69
  • Ability to account for the direction of object color shifts
  • Represents the overall color quality of products for all types of light sources

The Meaning of Colors

RED

  • 700nm
  • 2nd most visible color
  • Red areas perceived as moving forward
  • Lymph system and skeletal system
  • Love and aggression

ORANGE

  • 650nm
  • Pride, ambition
  • Reproductive system
  • Stimulates activity, appetite and socialization

YELLOW

  • 600nm
  • Luminous and most visible color
  • Power center- above navel
  • Mentally stimulating, activates memory, encourages communication

GREEN

  • 550nm
  • Nature, prosperity, healing, fertility
  • Heart chakra
  • Soothing, alleviates depression and anxiety, renewal and harmony

BLUE

  • 500nm
  • Sharply refracted by the eyes
  • Pushing the image back to appear receding
  • Appetite suppressant
  • Calming, aids intuition

INDIGO

  • 450nm
  • Inner self, spiritual
  • Eyes, ears, nose brain

VIOLET

  • 400nm
  • Most powerful wavelength
  • Crown chakra: head, brain, nervous system
  • Uplifting, calming, encourages creativity, meditation

WHITE

  • Purity, cleanliness
  • Aids mental clarity
  • Purification of thoughts and actions
  • Fresh beginnings

BLACK

  • Authoritative, powerful
  • Inconspicuous, mysterious evoking potential and possibility
  • Restful emptiness

BROWN

  • Stable, reliable, approachable
  • Wholesomeness
  • Connection to Earth
  • Orderliness
Blue Frog: AWA Lighting Designers project

Blue Frog: AWA Lighting Designers project

WE ARE HIRING

We are seeking bright stars to join our Mumbai studio. If you are a creative, intelligent, and sincere lighting design professional with an architectural, interior design, electrical or theater background, we will like to hear from you.

Please email your resume and portfolio of sample work to mumbai@awalightingdesigners.com. Please make sure you have the required skills & disposition for this job before you send in your resume.

Defining Shadows and Darkness

“It is necessary to return to the point where the interplay of light and dark reveals forms, and in this way to bring richness back into architectural space. Yet, the richness and depth of darkness has disappeared from our consciousness, and the subtle nuances that light and darkness engender, their spatial resonance – these are almost forgotten. Today, when all is cast in homogenous light, I am committed to pursuing the interrelationship of light and darkness . Light, whose beauty within darkness is as of jewels that one might cup in one’s hands; light that, hollowing out darkness and piercing our bodies, blows life into ‘place’.”

– Tadao Ando (1990)

AWA Lighting Designers project: Cyber Hub

AWA Lighting Designers project: Cyber Hub

 

WE ARE HIRING

We are seeking bright stars to join our Mumbai studio. If you are a creative, intelligent, and sincere lighting design professional with an architectural, interior design, electrical or theater background, we will like to hear from you.

Please email your resume and portfolio of sample work to mumbai@awalightingdesigners.com. Please make sure you have the required skills & disposition for this job before you send in your resume.

Elements of Culture

As mentioned before, as the description of culture gets broader, the more accurate it becomes. The definition of culture is therefore better understood when the different variables that define it are studied. In order to get a better resolution on what culture really stands for, it is important to understand the ingredients/ elements that contribute to a culture. Some of these elements include Industrial Design, Graphic Design, Architecture, Climatic Conditions, Philosophy, Technology, Economics, Religion, Literature, Politics, Tradition, Ritual, Custom, Human Biology, Physiological Differences and Natural Resources. Lighting solutions in different cultures carry certain unifying elements, and then there are local variations that may arise due to any of the reasons listed above. To begin by establishing a metaphor for our theory of cultural lighting adaptations, we can take the example of the McDonald’s fast food chain and the many iterations of its standard menu that appear around the world.  While the McDonald’s brand and the connection to its standard American menu is maintained in the style of presentation and with the continuation of certain standard items, regional variations are frequently taken into account in order to make McDonald’s more accessible to cultures with specific dietary requirements and restrictions. 

The signature Big Mac burger, well-known to Americans since 1968, has become a veritable symbol of capitalism, used by The Economist as a gauge of purchasing power parity between currencies in what is termed the ‘Big Mac Index’. A standard Big Mac includes a three-part bun (including the middle ‘club’ bun layer), double beef patties, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, and special sauce.  In India, however, you will find the Maharajah Mac, or perhaps a Chicken Tikka Burger, instead.  Since local custom prohibits eating beef, both versions of the Mac here have incorporated lamb or chicken in deference to the local population.  In Pakistan, you would likely find a McChutney Burger, developed using a popular regional type of condiment.  In Japan, a Tsukimi Burger (Moon-Viewing Burger) co-opts the appeal of the yearly autumn tradition of moon-viewing and incorporates a fried egg, which resembles the full moon.  Israel’s McShawarma substitutes the commonly found shaved meat composite for beef patties and is served on local flatbread, rather than a sesame-seed bun.  In some cases, the Mac varies so much that it little resembles the American prototype, but adaptations to the local context make the product more familiar and appropriate, while retaining the brand ‘aura’ of the original.

  • Belgium:   Croque McDo
  • France:   French fries are fried potatoes
  • Hong Kong:  Rice-Fan-Tastic, McRice
  • India:   Maharajah Mac, chicken tikka burger, veg burger (no beef)
  • Israel:   McShawarma, barbecued vs. fried beef patties
  • Japan:   Tsukimi Burger (Moon-Viewing Burger!)
  • Pakistan:  McKofta, McChutney Burger
  • South Korea: McBingsoo (Korean shaved ice)
  • USA:  Super-Sizing

WE ARE HIRING

We are seeking bright stars to join our Mumbai studio. If you are a creative, intelligent, and sincere lighting design professional with an architectural, interior design, electrical or theater background, we will like to hear from you.

Please email your resume and portfolio of sample work to mumbai@awalightingdesigners.com. Please make sure you have the required skills & disposition for this job before you send in your resume.

Zara Swings Record Lease Deal in Fort

Mumbai: A heritage building in the Hutatma Chowk area in south Mumbai will soon be the largest retail space in a high street for a foreign brand in the country.

In a deal touted as the biggest transaction of its kind in this segment, Zara, the Spanish clothing and accessories retailer, has taken on lease 50,000 sq ft carpet in Ismail building. Zara will pay around Rs 2.5 crore a month as lease rental to the building’s owner, Supariwala Exports. The deal works out to over Rs 450 a sq ft per month.

The four-storey Ismail building is near the ornamental Flora Fountain in the heritage Fort area. It earlier housed an office-cum-business centre. Now, the entire building will house the new Zara store.

Market sources said this is the largest high street retail space take up by an international brand ever in India.

The deal was brokered by global commercial real estate services firm, CBRE India. It refused to comment on the deal.

“This deal shows that there is a shortage of quality retail space in the country,” said market sources. “In Mumbai too there is a shortage of such space in malls,” they added.

A recent CBRE report said growing online sales will not deter retailers’ physical store expansion plans in 2016.

A study of over 150 major international brands based in Americas, Asia Pacific showed that while European countries dominate the target destinations this year, China is the top target market in Asia-Pacific region and the fourth most popular globally, with 27% of retailers looking to expand there.

Reference: The Times of India

Creating Sustainable Lighting Solutions

Bushwick Park: project by AWA Lighting Designers

Bushwick Park: project by AWA Lighting Designers

Over time, the architectural community has become increasingly invested in the realization of environmentally sustainable design, and this trend shows no sign of abating. This is a global movement. Sustainable solutions acting in a major metropolis can save building owners significantly on operational costs and cut back in vast quantities on the carbon emissions that would otherwise pervade. And, in other parts of the world, sustainable lighting solutions can make the difference between continuing one’s day, be that education, work or home tasks, or allowing darkness to swallow up needed hours of productivity. Thus, sustainability touches us all.

From low impact materials to energy efficiency, to design for reuse and recycling, there is much to be done. In this context, design connects architects with their partners and consultants, as they work toward their common goal of defining and creating structures that live up to the promise of sustainability. With architecture, technologies, materials and products all merge to create the tangible pieces of lighting design. In their collective application we see the final effects, and the success or failure of strategies and visions. How these pieces are put to use by installers and later by building occupants has tremendous importance on their visual comfort, efficiency performance, function and beauty that must be considered carefully from design inception.

Able to realize the vision of their architectural partners, lighting designers are critical members of the process. For, it is very true that one of the most efficient ways to reduce the overall carbon footprint of a structure is to amend its lighting design with smartly conceived and realized design. And, in the developing world, sustainable lighting nourishes the very essence of life. Thus, although it is just one piece of the puzzle, lighting has an outsized effect on sustainability. Understanding what is possible in this arena only serves to invigorate a practice and encourage new paradigms.

Light triggers critical physiological and psychological responses within human beings. And, since most of us spend the majority of our lives in the built environment, the level and quality of light within these buildings has real implications for our health and wellness. Luckily, today’s architect is armed with sophisticated structural options that allow for more lighting choices than at any point in architecture’s history. In today’s design world, it is no longer a question of whether to design with light in mind, but how to design with light in mind. As we become more aware of light’s implications on our physiological and psychological selves, and as technology affords a greater range of options, architects and their partners are left with an increased repertoire to draw from.  As it relates to health and wellness, the key points to consider are the quality, the quantity and the type of light being delivered within the space. 

Consider first how light comes into play in a health-oriented society. Many functions necessary for growth and well being such as breathing, sleeping, blood pressure, body temperature, appetite, moods, mental acuity, and the immune system are governed by the endocrine system, which is strongly impacted and affected by light, both natural & created by electric sources. There is also evidence suggesting that proper quantities of visually perceived light are needed for healthy functioning of the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that controls motivation, learning, and creativity; the limbic system, the part of the brain that stores emotional impressions of the world; and the motor cortex and the brain stem, the parts of the brain that coordinate body movement and the maintenance of life.