Monthly Archives: June 2015

AWA Projects Featured in “Bright 2” published by the Frame Group, Netherlands

Dear Friends:

We are pleased to share that AWA was featured in Bright 2, a recent publication on architectural illumination and light installations. This publication by the Frame Group, Netherlands, showcases the work of forty-four design studios around the world. AWA is one out of four design studios from the United States to be featured in this book. Earlier in 2007, AWA had also been featured in Bright 1

For a PDF copy of the section on AWA Lighting Designers in Bright 2, please click HERE.

If you would like to read more about Bright 2 and Frame, please click HERE.

The editors at Frame chose to feature AWA’s Brigade Gateway Complex, for its intent to create a paradigm shift in the lighting of public spaces and mixed-use environments. This book also highlights three additional AWA Projects: Cyber Hub, Singapore Chancery, and FIFC.

Best wishes from the team at AWA Lighting Designers.

Bright 2 Cover

Bright 2 Cover

Brigade Gateway Complex Cover Spread from Bright 2

Brigade Gateway Complex Cover Spread from Bright 2

Brigade Gateway Complex Second Spread from Bright 2

Brigade Gateway Complex Second Spread from Bright 2

Brigade Gateway Complex Third Spread from Bright 2

Brigade Gateway Complex Third Spread from Bright 2

Spread of Additional AWA Projects Featured in Bright 2

Spread of Additional AWA Projects Featured in Bright 2

 

‘Clean the Air. Let the Future Breathe Again’ – Smoke to Illustrate Dangers of Air Pollution

Projection on Smoke

The project helps illustrate how crucial the issue of air pollution is for future generations

exiaozhudesignboom03

xiao zhu uses factory smoke to illustrate dangers of air pollution

Xiao Zhu is a chinese company dedicated to providing clean air to its citizens. The country sees more than 500,000 die every year from causes related in some way to extreme levels of airborne contaminants. Like most socially conscious businesses, entering better products into the market is often only a small part of a larger equation; true change lies within education and protest. To make an impact, xiao zhu needed to show the people of china how crucial the issue is, and they did so in the most direct means possible.

Click HERE to read more about the project

Article Written by : Nick Brink

GIF & Image courtesy of : Xiao Zhu

Source : Designboom

The world’s smallest projection mapping on a Grain of Rice

Projection-Mapped Grain of Rice a (Tiny) Feast for the Senses

Projection-mapped a single grain of rice

0483d26666022a2565ed3be6bb085eb5

A tiny light play 5 mm high

At this year’s Salone del Milano, creative studio Drill Tokyo projection-mapped a single grain of rice. According to the creators, it’s the “the world’s smallest projection mapping” achievement to-date, a tiny light play 5 mm high, infinitesimally in diameter, and ghostly white in hue. A single grain is housed in a cubic chamber, where it hovers on thin threads in front of the narrow beam. As viewers peer through a magnified glass and into the box’s peephole, “the texture of the ‘rice’ begins to change so that it is no longer just rice,” Drill Tokyo explains. Through “textures” of spinning florals, chaotic scribbles, teeny tiny explosions, the team engrains the aesthetic essence of Japan onto the face of the culture’s most symbolic crop.

Click HERE to see more images

Article Written by : Sami Emory

GIF & Image courtesy of : Sami Emory

Source : thecreatorsproject

Lighting Zeitgeist- Culture, Light Levels and Economics- Part 3 of many

Over time, we have often seen a shift in requirements within a culture or people. In the United States in the 50’s and 60’s, the popular adage was “more light, better sight.” When the OPEC energy crisis occurred in 1973, it required a serious re-examination of light levels and prompted many research excursions to show that we could work as efficiently in much less light.In the last 50 years, as other areas of the world have found prosperity and technology has become more affordable, traditional constructs of light and darkness have been replaced by grossly overlit spaces. The flip in perceptions is best highlighted by the following two quotes taken from two authors from two different parts of the world, quoting 75 years apart in time.

 The eastern world of early 20th century :
• “We Orientals tend to seek our satisfactions in whatever surroundings we happen to find ourselves, to content ourselves with things as they are; and so darkness causes us no discontent, we resign ourselves to it as inevitable.
• But the westerner is determined always to better his lot…..from candle to oil lamp, oil lamp to gaslight, gaslight to electric light – his quest for a brighter light never ceases, he spares no pains to eradicate even the minutest shadow” – Jun’ichiro Tanizaki, in praise of shadows, Japan [1933]  1950s America :
• The popular adage “more light, better sight” dominated our approach to lighting
• Light levels: +1000 lux
 Post-1973 opec crisis:
• Re-examination of required light levels
• Work more efficiently with less light
• Light levels: reduced to 500 lux
 Today:
• “Some judicious use of shadow would help humanize our over-lit lives.”
• Darkness: basking in the dimming of the light
• Murray Whyte, Toronto Star, Canada (2008)
• Light levels: further reduced to 300 lux

Reflexively, as the ‘green’ movement gains momentum, it inspires the search for more efficient lighting solutions, which in turn leads to the development of halogen lamps, and eventually, light emitting diodes (LED’s). The emergence of the tiny, long-lasting, inexpensive LED’s is anticipated to dramatically change the lighting situations in many developing nations where, previously, people relied more on natural light and on planning activities during times when it was available. In the last 50 years, as other areas of the world have found prosperity and technology has become more affordable, traditional constructs of light and darkness have been replaced by grossly over lit spaces. The critique here is clear, that just because technology is affordable and easy to install it doesn’t mean that it should be implemented carte blanche. All technology is susceptible to environmental concerns, and although LED’s do provide superior lighting efficiency in energy of use sense, the current rate of production to fill the gaps aforementioned cannot be sustained in the long term to meet that demand. The reality of the industry is that we have an uncertain supply of both energy and materials which should be addressed not through techno-solving, but rather through simple ethical implementation into the design process, which starts with the simple question “do we really need this?”

The tide of the ‘green’ movements influence in expanding the implementation of ethically sustainable practices into design can be seen through several different certifications and policy initiatives undertaken in recent years. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification formed by the U.S. Green Building Council is the world’s leading certification in sustainable design for architecture in the United States. Developed by the 20,000 or so members of the council, the certification is won by adhering voluntarily to the standards developed by the council for that specific year. The standards evolve and are voted on by the council every year, with the certification goals becoming ever more progressive.

The same progression can be seen through the evolution of the United States congress bill, the 1992 Energy Policy Act (Epact), in which states had to review and consider adopting national model energy standards. In 2007 the Department of Energy updated the policy to improve energy conservation by 3.7%, followed by an update in 2010 to bring the total to 18.2%. The policy debate surrounding sustainability has a large influence on the discussion about light and how we use it. Though we do see change through initiatives like the LEED certification and the Epact, the zeitgeist still turns toward techno-solving as our chosen methodology for escaping our sins. Technologies such as wind power, hydro-power and nuclear power all contribute to the discussion about how we can make our energy production renewable, however the conversation surround how much we should need and how much we are really using is still too quiet.

1950’s OFFICE LIGHTING- MORE LIGHT BETTER SIGHT, 1973 GAS RATIONING IN THE US

ottowa City Counsel

US Gas Rationing 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Examples of Caged Architecture

51793b0a485de19201f3b89bde65d2c2

Tori Tori Restaurant Mexico City, Mexico

DSC09944

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, London, U.K.

In most contexts, a cage represents imprisonment or an otherwise undesirable restriction of one’s freedom. However, within the realm of architectural design, cages themselves can be freed from the negative connotation of containment: well-designed instances can dramatically enhance the structure or space they contain, framing views, creating visual dynamism, and filtering light to fantastic effect inside and out.
Wrapped in mesh, latticework, timber weaves, or slender piping, here are eight examples — including a 2015 A+Awards Special Achievement Honoree — that show how being caged is not always a bad thing.

Click HERE to read more about other projects

Image courtesy of : From Website

Source : Architizer

Lighting Zeitgeist: Culture, Climate and Materials (Part 2 of many)

Culture, climate and materiality  form the three pillars of light that are the bedrock for our critique of the lighting zeitgeist.

Climate and materiality are two great concerns within lighting, but while they possess enormous influence, they do have clearly defined boundaries. The broader a definition is of culture, the more accurate it becomes; the inverse for both climate and materiality. The flexible nature of culture holds a great deal of interest for design, in that how we manifest objects, systems and behaviors through design is a large part of the dialogue surrounding the question; what is culture? Lighting solutions internationally balance universal ideas about light with local variations. A given culture’s position in the global economic development cycle is often reflected in its use of lighting in urban, night environments. However, striking a balance between regional differences and globalization is often a challenge.
o The culture of lighting defines us. In an era that is increasingly segmented, with a renewed focus on site-specific, culturally aware design, every practitioner in the built environment can benefit from better understanding the implications of culture in lighting design. While the nature of culture is interesting, attempting to define or sculpt its wide boundaries is not the primary aim of this posting- Starting a  dialog on the differing nature of culture globally as it affects light is- we are interested in how culture informs light and affects how we perceive light.
o Every culture has had a distinct relationship with light, and that continues today. As it is manifest, light defines broader tastes and styles within a culture. And, this has deeper implications than mere fashion or vogue. As more firms and practitioners begin to operate across geographic boundaries, understanding cultural drivers is critical for meeting the needs of the populous- From lighting the villages of India to designing civic, residential and institutional environments in New York City, to exploring the burgeoning and conflicted world of the Middle East, every practitioner in the built environment can benefit from better understanding the implications of culture in lighting design.
o What are the elements that define individual cultures? We might list the arts, architecture, technology, economics, religion, literature, politics, tradition and ritual, human biology and physiology, local conditions, climate, and natural resources. In analyzing a culture’s unique views on lighting, we might consider light in relationship to each of the above elements. While certain elements, like the human physiological response, remain consistent cross-culturally, others, such as climate or religious traditions, can vary immensely.

THE LIGHT SHOW AT HONG KONG HARBOR- A CULTURE’S UNIQUE VIEW ON LIGHT

AND

THE LIGHTS IN MARRAKESH- DIFFERENT YET BEAUTIFUL AND ENGAGING!

symphony of light hongkong 2

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light and Culture: Our Zeitgiest (Part 1 of many)

Over the past many years, the good people at the AWA studios internationally have contributed to research on how their lighting solutions for architectural environments can be more responsive to their culture and local conditions- a tough task, as it is tempting to just say “screw it” and follow the rules established by the overt Americanization of codes and standards, and supplemented by the economics and marketing of European fixtures.

Our hypothesis on our Lighting Zeitgeist is as follows:

1. We feel that lighting balances universal ideas about light with local variations.

2. A given culture’s position in the global economic development cycle is reflected in its use of lighting in urban, built and un-built, nighttime environments.

3. Successful lighting design balances human instinct to gravitate toward light with human resistance to over-lighting.

 

To further elaborate this hypothesis, we were inspired by the Gartner Hype Cycle- and we adapted this concept with modifications to reflect upon the pushes and pulls of lighting design.

Our response was that our Zeitgeist is an orchestra of pulls and pushes of varying force and direction that follows a Gartner Hype cycle shown below, while being impacted by the X and Y axis variables.

 

AWA- CULTURE CLIMATE LIGHTING DIAGRAM -Final - Oct 2013-01

 

OUT OF DARKNESS!

“It is necessary to return to the point where the interplay of light and dark Reveals forms, and in this way to bring richness back into architectural space. Yet, the richness and depth of darkness has disappeared from our consciousness, and the subtle nuances that light and darkness engender, their spatial resonance – these are almost forgotten. Today, when all is cast in homogeneous light, I am committed to pursuing the interrelationship of light and darkness. Light, whose beauty within darkness is as of jewels that one might cup in one’s hands; light that, hollowing out darkness and piercing our bodies, blows life into ‘place’.”
– Tadao Ando (1990)

What is darkness, and what is shadow? Darkness is the absence of light, while shadow is the comparative darkness that results from the blocking of light.

As Lighting Designers, several of us use light like our jobs depended on it- literally. I firmly believe that overusing light, often to validate our professional existence, is a professional mistake.

Light depends on darkness and shadow to come to life, and create a harmonious lit visual environment.

 

out of the shadows

 

AWA Featured in Bright 2

Dear Friends:

We are pleased to share that AWA was featured in Bright 2, a recent publication on architectural illumination and light installations. This publication by the Frame Group, Netherlands, showcases the work of forty-four design studios around the world. AWA is one out of four design studios from the United States to be featured in this book. Earlier in 2007, AWA had also been featured in Bright (1).

The editors at Frame chose to feature AWA’s Brigade Gateway Complex, for its intent to create a paradigm shift in the lighting of public spaces and mixed-use environments. This book also highlights three additional AWA Projects: Cyber Hub, Singapore Chancery, and FIFC.

If you would like to read more about Bright 2 and Frame, please click HERE.

If you would like to discuss our lighting philosophy and approach, please feel free to contact me directly. I can be reached at abhay@awalightingdesigners.com, or by calling me directly on my cell phone at +1.917.597.1600.

Best wishes from the team at AWA.

Abhay Wadhwa
Design Principal l CEO
AWA Lighting Designers

 

Cover of Bright 2 and opening page from AWA section of book

Cover of Bright 2 and opening page from AWA section of book

Brigade Gateway Complex

“AWA Lighting Designers sought to create a paradigm shift for lighting of public spaces and mixed-use environments when designing the Brigade Gateway Complex, an integrated lifestyle enclave located in Bangalore, India. The project’s broad scope enabled the team to create diverse solutions and compelling compositions with landscape and facade elements.”

The Brigade Gateway is an integrated lifestyle enclave located in Bangalore, India. The project is situated on a 40 acre site and comprises of the following areas:
• World Trade Center: 29 floors, 2 basements, Ground floor
• Orion Mall: 1.1 million sqft
• Artificial lake
• Residential Podium: 13 Towers – 625,000 sqft
• Club House
• Brigade School: Nursery to Std 8
• Multi-Level Car Park: 2000 cars
• Children’s Park
• Columbia Asia Hospital
• Sheraton Hotel*
The World Trade Center is the first fully privately owned installation of a WTC in India and is the tallest commercial building in the city of Bangalore. The city of Bangalore produces a large percentage of the software exports from India as well as other public sector heavy industries and is proud to see its growth manifested in this new building and complex.

*Sheraton Hotel: AWA scope was landscape lighting only

PROJECT TEAM:

Client: Brigade Group  

Architect: HOK, VA, DSP, Michael Foley Design

Lighting Consultant: AWA Lighting Designers

Areal view of WTC and Brigade Gateway Complex

Areal view of WTC and Brigade Gateway Complex

View of WTC and Orion Mall from across the lake at Residential Tower

View of WTC and Orion Mall from across the lake at Residential Tower

WTC is Bangalore's tallest building

WTC is Bangalore’s tallest building

For more images and information about the Brigade Gateway Complex, please visit our website HERE.