Monthly Archives: September 2014

Tour a NYC Building a Day Throughout Archtober

Kickstarter / Ole Sondresen Architect © Ole Sondresen

Kickstarter / Ole Sondresen Architect © Ole Sondresen

If you live in or plan to visit New York City during the month of October, we suggest you set aside some time to participate in one of Archtober’s many events. What is Archtober? Archtober is New York’s official Architecture and Design Month. Hosted by the Center for Architecture and the AIA New York Chapter, the annual festival organizes a plethora of architecture activities, programs and exhibitions to take place throughout city during the month of October. The goal is to raise awareness of the important role design plays in the city, celebrate the richness of New York’s built environment, and simply enjoy some great architecture.

Archtober highlights include the Architecture & Design Film Festival at Tribeca Cinemas; the Municipal Art Society Summit for New York City, featuring over 100 speakers gathered “to debate the future of our city and spark conversations about planning, design, infrastructure, preservation, culture, and development;” the Pratt Institute’s “City by Numbers: Big Data and the Urban Future” symposium; and 31 architect-led “Building of the Day” tours.

Click HERE Preview a selection of building’s on tour and find.

Written by: Rosenfield, Kariss

Image Courtesy of: Ole Sondresen

Source: ArchDaily

Post-Industrial Landscape Turned Machine-Age Playground

The “Skywheel” attraction. Image © Gili Merin

The “Skywheel” attraction. Image © Gili Merin

Derelict urban landscapes and abandoned spaces have always attracted adventurous explorers, searching for a peek into the world of a fallen industrial dystopia. That desire can be fulfilled by a visit to the Zollverein complex in Essen, Germany: once Europe’s largest coal mine, Zeche Zollverein was transformed over 25 years into an architectural paradise. Contributions by Rem Koolhaas, Norman Foster and SANAA are included in the 100-hectare park; overwhelming in its complexity, the estate includes rusty pipes, colossal coal ovens and tall chimneys, inviting over 500,000 people per day to gain an insight into the golden age of European heavy-industry.

Click HERE to see more about the project.

Written by: Gili Merin

Image Courtesy of: Gili Merin

Source: ArchDaily

Bjarke Ingels Reveals Plans For Aarhus Island Promenade

Aarhus Island Basin Promenade - image courtesy of bjarke ingels group

Aarhus Island Basin Promenade – image courtesy of bjarke ingels group

Bjarke Ingels has presented plans for a public promenade to be built in Aarhus, stretching along the harbor of Denmark’s second largest city. The mixed-use scheme includes over 200 residential units alongside a variety of spaces for recreational activities that adapt to the surrounding context./span>

Known as ‘Aarhus Island’, the project incorporates large and small scale interventions within its design, with carefully programmed areas intended to encourage social interaction and activate the entirety of the esplanade. Construction on-site is scheduled to begin in 2015, with the first apartments ready for occupation by 2017.

Click HERE to see more about the project.

Written by: Philip Stevens

Image Courtesy of: Bjarke Ingels Group

Source: Designboom

Five Buildings Compete to be Named “World’s Best Highrise”

Bosco Verticale, Milan / Boeri Studio. Image © Kirsten Bucher

Bosco Verticale, Milan / Boeri Studio. Image © Kirsten Bucher

Rem Koolhaas, Steven Holl, Jean Nouvel and Stefano Boeri are the masters behind five skyscrapers competing to be crowned the “World’s best.” Chosen as finalists for the 2014 International Highrise Award (IHA), the four practices are in the running for a prestigious title and €50,000 prize.

Award organizers from the City of Frankfurt/Main, Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) and DekaBank at Frankfurt’s Paulskirche will announce a winner in mid-November. The chosen skyscraper will be selected by an esteemed, multidisciplinary jury based on the criteria ranging from future-oriented design and innovative building technology, to the building’s integrative urban development scheme and cost-effectiveness.

“Good architecture requires a willingness to take risks and a desire to try things out. All the finalists took this approach – there can be no innovation without experimentation. Our shortlist comprises three different prototypes of the future,” commented Jury Chairman Christoph Ingenhoven.

CLICK HERE to view full article and view all five of the competing highrises and the jury’s comments.

Written by: Karissa Rosenfield

Image Courtesy of: Brett Boardman

Source: ArchDaily

Trifolium by AR-MA

Trifolium, Paddington Australia - Image by Brett Boardman

Trifolium, Paddington Australia – Image by Brett Boardman

 

Fugitive Structures in an architectural design competition commissioned by SCAF (Sherman Contemporary Arts Foundation) in Sydney, Australia. It is an invited competition, run annually over four years that seeks to showcase emerging architects from Australia, the Asia-Pacific and the Middle East. The brief was to explore the potential of digital pre-fabrication. In 2014, AR-MA were successful in securing the commission.

AR-MA’s design, “Trifolium”, is a fluid, continuous, event-space composed of self-supporting Corian with an interior of curved, black, mirror-polished stainless steel panels. Fabricated like a jewellery box, with over three-thousand unique parts, it is designed to less than 1mm of tolerance.

Click HERE to read more about the project.

Written by: AR-MA

Image Courtesy of: Brett Boardman

Source: ArchDaily

4 Visions Released for D.C.’s First Elevated Park

11th Street Bridge Park—the Anacostia Crossing  © OLIN / OMA

11th Street Bridge Park—the Anacostia Crossing © OLIN / OMA

 

OMA, Höweler + Yoon, NEXT Architects, and Balmori Associates are amongst four interdisciplinary teams competing to design Washington D.C.’s first elevated public park. As part of a six month nationwide competition, the shortlisted teams have just released their preliminary design proposals for what will be known as the 11th Street Bridge Park.

Suspended over the Anacostia River, the multi-use park aims to re-connect two disparate city districts and re-engage residents with the riverfront by offering a 21st century civic “playscape.” Education and performance spaces, as well as a cafe and water sport areas will all be included in the masterplan.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Karissa Rosenfield

Image Courtesy of: OLIN / OMA

Source: ArchDaily

How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future

Animal Printheads Biomimicry - photo by John Becker

Animal Printheads Biomimicry – photo by John Becker

 

Biomimicry is quickly emerging as one of the next architectural frontiers. New manufacturing processes such as 3D printing, coupled with the drive to make buildings more environmentally sustainable, have led to a wave of projects that are derived from natural phenomena or even constructed with biological materials. A recent example of this trend is “Hy-Fi,” this summer’s MoMA PS1 design that is constructed of organic and compostable eco-bricks. Other projects such as MIT Media Lab’s Silk Pavilion have taken biological innovation a step further by actually using a biometric construction processes – around 6,500 silkworms wove the Silk Pavilion’s membrane. “Animal Printheads,” asGeoff Manaugh calls them in his article “Architecture-By-Bee and Other Animal Printheads,” have already proven to be a viable part of the manufacturing process in art, and perhaps in the future, the built environment as well. But what happens when humans engineer animals to 3D print other materials?

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Evan Rawn

Image Courtesy of: John Becker

Source: ArchDaily

Seven Digital Experiences by Teamlab Surround Viewers At Pace Gallery

image courtesy of pace gallery

image courtesy of pace gallery

 

For their first-ever exhibition in the United States, Tokyo-based Teamlab presents ‘Ultra Subjective Space‘, a display of 7 immersive digital works at Page Gallery, New York. As a fusion of technology and art, the experiential atmosphere surrounds visitors on large-scale screens, projecting looped videos which investigate perspective, time and the distortion of space.

Click HERE to experience some of the immersive digital works.

Written by: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: Pace Gallery

Source: Designboom

Designers Turn Shipping Container Into A Human-Scale Kaleidoscope

image courtesy of masakazu shirane + saya miyazaki

image courtesy of masakazu shirane + saya miyazaki

 

Japanese designers Masakazu Shirane and Saya Miyazaki immerse visitors to ‘Wink’ in a human-scale kaleidoscope, reflecting them within a maze of geometrically shaped mirrors. Set inside the confines of a 40-foot-long industrial shipping container, the installation unties both architecture and art, and intends to shift traditional structural concepts and ideas about the two disciplines. Not only an experiential creation, ‘Wink’ is also an example of ‘Zipper Architecture’: all of the interior panels are connected by detachable cords, and each singular unit can be opened and closed like a window. ‘this idea could solve global environmental problems’ the designers describe ‘because it is easy to exchange only a part with a zipper.’.

Click HERE to read full article.

Written by: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: Masakazu Shirane + Saya Miyazaki

Source: Designboom