Monthly Archives: August 2014

luminous lanterns form sensual wave in la grande motte, france

luminous lanterns form sensual wave in la grande motte, france by Paul Kozlowsk

luminous lanterns form sensual wave in la grande motte, france by Paul Kozlowski

 

Set along La Grande Motte harbor in France, french architects Marion Moustey and Alexandre Arcens have placed an ephemeral installation facing the calm sea. ‘Sensual Wave’ (Onde Sensuelle) comprises rows of luminous lanterns carefully hung on string, tied from one end of a floating dock to the other.

The project, conceived for Festival Des Architectures Vives, is meant to recall the voluptuous curves of the female form, evoking a woman’s contour and characteristics through the use of a lace material canvassing the spherical orbs. The texture creates a play of shadow and light, casting round reflections onto the surface of the water below. ‘the sensual wave plays with water, without ever touching it, brushes it, goes away from it.’ the architects describe ‘as a magical moment, the ephemeral character of the installation evokes a wave that we can’t hold back.

Click HERE to read full article.

Written by: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: Paul Kozlowski

Source: Designboom

Just Like Taco Trucks, Art Takes to the Road

The Rodi Gallery - Aaron Graham

The Rodi Gallery – Aaron Graham

 

On a recent Saturday, Elise Graham and her 23-year-old son, Aaron, pulled a 12-foot van into a parking spot on West 14th Street in Greenwich Village, swung open the back doors, lowered the aluminum stairs, and welcomed visitors inside their mobile Rodi Gallery.

Around the United States, art is on the roll. Inspired by the success of food trucks, gallery owners like the Grahams, who are based in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., have been taking their show on the road. For the last year, they have traveled to populated spots like the meatpacking district of Manhattan, the Peekskill train station and Astoria Park in Queens. This Saturday, they are parking in the center of Bushwick Open Studios, a three-day festival in Brooklyn.

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Written by: Alyson Krueger

Image Courtesy of: Aaron Graham

Source: New York Times

Light Matters: Creating Walls of Light

171 Collins Street by Bates Smart Architects and Electrolight

171 Collins Street by Bates Smart Architects and Electrolight

 

Modernism induced a shift in lighting away from luminaires and towards invisible light sources that render spaces in a purer (forgive the pun) light. For the first time, lit walls were used to define rooms and to structure architecture. Today Thomas Schielke explores early prototypes – including Philip Johnson’s Brick House and the Seagram Building – and discusses how their lighting techniques continue to influence architecture today.

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Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Dean Bradley

Source: ArchDaily

CurrentSet: A Digital Drawing App That Fosters Collaboration

Current Set logo

 

 

CurrentSet, one of a number of cloud-based digital apps for managing construction drawings on the go, seeks to foster collaboration among architects, project managers and on-site professionals. Uniquely, the app is offered free of charge before allowing users to add features as and when they require them.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: James Taylor Foster

Image Courtesy of: Current Set

Source: ArchDaily

15 Most Awesome Lamp And Chandelier Designs A Must See!

Cloud lamp by Richard Clarkson

Cloud lamp by Richard Clarkson

 

Light is very important for every home, but it’s also so much more then that. The unique design of lamps and chandeliers can change the look of the entire room. In this post ‘Colors and Joy’ collected some very creative lamps from different sources which show the talented artwork of artists as well. All are DIY Lamp designs created by talented people and creative artists.

Click HERE to see all the designs.

Written by: Johnny James

Source: Colors and Joy

Michael Candy Handcrafts Helical Kinetic Light s

Sculpture by Michael Candy

Sculpture by Michael Candy

 

Suspended within the walls of an old dockside warehouse in India, a creature waves its long arms upwards and downwards in a hypnotizing fashion. The plywood and metal body articulates 18 fluorescent tubes that radiate waves of light onto the surrounding architecture as they gently move around its spine. The overall effect is anamorphic, where the individual beams move as one, floating above the surface of the ground. Completed over the course of one month during the Kochi Artist in Residency program, this describes the work of creative mind Michael Candy called ‘Big Dipper.’

For the construction, the Australia-based artist collaborated with a local metal shop to craft some of the more complex metal components. These intricacies are apparent in the roller chains located along the main axis of the structure that move around the circumference of a steel circle located between every pair of bulbs. Their stability is ensured by two zip ties that connect back to the jigsaw-cut wooden modules following the rotation of the central helix mechanism.

Click HERE to see all the images.

Written by: Michael Candy

Image Courtesy of: Michael Candy

Source: DesignBoom

Mohammad Domiri Documents the Intricacy of Iranian Architecture

Shah Emam Mosque in Isfahan, Esfahan, Iran

Shah Emam Mosque in Isfahan, Esfahan, Iran

 

The labyrinth motifs ubiquitous throughout Middle Eastern culture are often incredibly complex and intricate in their composition and detail. Places of religious worship are adorned with kaleidoscopic colors and rich ornamentation within their interior walls and onto the ceilings, establishing a space that hypnotizes those inside.

Northern Iranian student Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji has photographed these sacred structures in a series of panoramic photographs, revealing the depths of these vast architectural expanses in a single shot. Towering domes painted vibrant blues and yellows are etched and painted with undulating designs; elaborate floral decorations made from mosaics line the floors and walls; light cast from stained glass brings brightly hued shadows into the spaces.

Click HERE to see all the images.

Written by: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: Mohammed Domiri

Source: DesignBoom

Here Are The 12 Cities That Will Shake Up The Art World In The 21st Century

Someone Left a Horse on the Shore by Gigi Scaria

Someone Left a Horse on the Shore by Gigi Scaria

 

Cities like New York and Paris have long captured the art world’s attention, wooing artists, collectors, critics and curators who have hurried to call the hubs home. Other storied art havens include Los Angeles, Berlin and Hong Kong, amongst others — locales that have managed to snare auction houses or gallery giants, rounding out an entirely too sparse a map of art destinations.

A new book, however, is attempting to challenge this perception of the exclusive art world. Titled “Art Cities of the Future,” the publication introduces us to places like Singapore or Lagos, Nigeria, art communities that are poised to shake things up in the 21st century.

Compiled by a group of curators, the 336-page book surveys 12 global cities to watch out for, chosen for their impact on contemporary art, history of artistic importance, and overall cultural climate. Some choices are surprising (Cluj, Romania, anyone?), while others have been on the verge of becoming major players for some time (ahem, Istanbul).

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Katherine Brooks

Source: Huffington Post

Light Matters: Glass Beyond Transparency with James Carpenter

7 World Trade Center

7 World Trade Center

In Modernism’s attempt to dissolve spatial boundaries with transparency, the material used – glass – is all too often dematerialised. In contrast, the New York-based designer James Carpenter is interested in multiple readings of glass – beyond transparency.

As Carpenter explains: “People approach light in relationship to architecture. It is that the light is the means by which the architecture is revealed and the architecture is basically defined by the way the light enters the space. I tend to think actually from the opposite direction where the light itself is what informs the architecture. The architecture is in service of light rather than the other way around.”

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written by: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: David Sundberg

Source: ArchDaily