Monthly Archives: July 2014

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado

The Swings by Daily Tous Les Jours

The Swings by Daily Tous Les Jours

 

Canadian design collective Daily Tous Les Jours (previously) was recently invited to bring their fantastic musical light swing installation to the Green Box Arts Festival in Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. The interactive swing set titled simply, ‘The Swings’, is comprised of illuminated panels that also trigger audible tones that harmonize as people swing. As more and more people join in the act of swinging turns into randomly improvised melody and light show. From their project site:

“The Swings allow participants to make music with their entire bodies, to connect to one another and to have a sense of ownership of public space due to the music they create. The result is a giant collective instrument that brings together people of all ages and backgrounds. The project offers a new experience in collective music making, available to enliven urban spaces, festivals, special events, and more.”

The Swings were on view through July 11th of this month, but the entire installation is now on tour.

Click HERE to see all the images.

Written By: Christopher Jobson

Source: Colossal

Modernism in the Arab World: Bahrain’s Pavilion at the Venice Biennale

Bahrain's Pavilion at the Venice Biennale

Bahrain’s Pavilion at the Venice Biennale

 

In Bahrain‘s pavilion for the 2014 Venice Biennale, the country uses its position on the eastern edge of the pan-Arabic region to investigate modernity’s impact on the Arab world: first as a colonial imposition, then as a local attempt to reconcile global and Arabic culture, then finally as an acceptance of neoliberal ideals.

The exhibition collects 100 projects from across the Arabic states, with the intention of consolidating and preserving knowledge of this critical period. The installation itself, a giant bookcase, is the manifestation of this research, and will later be made available at the Arab Center for Architecture.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Image Courtesy of: Nico Saieh

Source: ArchDaily

Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time

Jadav Payeng

Jadav Payeng

 

Nestled in Northeast India next to the Brahmaputra River sits Majuli Island, a giant sandbar that happens to be the largest river island on Earth, home to some 150,000 people. It is also the location of the 1,360 acre Molai Forest, one of the most unusual woodlands in the world for the incredible fact that it was planted by a single man. Since 1979, forestry worker Jadav Payeng has dedicated his life to planting trees on the island, creating a forest that has surpassed the scale of New York’s Central Park.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Christopher Jobson

Source: Colossal

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art

Exbiotanica by Makoto Azuma

Exbiotanica by Makoto Azuma

 

Last week Japanese botanic artist Makoto Azuma attempted to go where most artists only dream of going: to space. In a project titled Exbiotanica, last week Azuma and his crew traveled to Black Rock Desert outside Gerlach, Nevada. In the dead of night Azuma’s project began. The team launched two of Azuma’s artworks – a 50-year old pine suspended from a metal frame and an arrangement of flowers – into the stratosphere using a large helium balloon. The entire project was documented, revealing some surreal photographs of plants floating above planet earth. “The best thing about this project is that space is so foreign to most of us,” says John Powell of JP Aerospace. “So seeing a familiar object like a bouquet of flowers flying above Earth domesticates space, and the idea of traveling into it.”

Click HERE to see all the images.

Written By: Johnny Strategy

Source: Colossal

junya.ishigami+associates Win Competition to Design World Peace Pavilion in Copenhagen

World Peace Pavilion by Junya Ishigami + Associates

World Peace Pavilion by junya.ishigami+associates

 

Svendborg Architects and junya.ishigami+associates have won first place in the HOPE Foundation’s House of Peace Competition. The competition brief calls for a monumental architectural installation to be built in the city harbor of Copenhagen, one that will endure as a lasting symbolic form devoted to world peace. The firms’ winning entry is a floating, cloud-like structure that seems almost to hover over the harbor’s horizon.

The design consists of an undulating plane that acts as both roof and walls for the structure. Where the floor should be, there is only the harbor water. Visitors to the pavilion can board circular boats and launch themselves into main “hall” of the space. The quiet lapping of the waves and the silent shell above them gives visitors the ideal space for contemplation, and creates a room that is meant to be the physical embodiment of peace.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Connor Walker

Image Courtesy of: junya.ishigami+associates

Source: ArchDaily

How Technology and Science are Disrupting the World of Design

3D Printed Cast by Jake Evill

3D Printed Cast by Jake Evill

 

Design is what shapes our built environment. But as we progress, creatives are turning more and more to nature – exploring biological systems and organic materials – as their driving influence for developing new products and constructed networks. It is no secret that technology and science are playing a larger role than ever before in shaping our world; and designers are harnessing the research and findings from these sectors to establish progressive and innovative products that could change our lives.

In particular, advancements in 3D printing are enabling us to process and manufacture ideas at a more rapid rate, which is changing the entire production industry. Jake Evill combines 3D scanning and printing technologies to develop a cast that could eliminate the clumsy plaster versions that have been bringing fracture stability for ages. Evill’s design takes into consideration the exact dimensions of the individual’s injured limb to ensure they are fitted with a cast that provides optimal comfort and support. This is the result of a mould that references an exoskeleton – a rigid external covering that is found on some invertebrates for protection. the make-up of the ‘cortex cast’, thus also provides a hygienic alternative. Being 3D printed from nylon makes it waterproof, easy to clean, super light, anatomically accurate as well as recyclable, just to name a few of its potential benefits; proving its potential to benefit to change the practice of extreme sports where athletes are more prone to frequent injury and broken bones is huge.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Andrea Chin

Image Courtesy of: Jake Evill

Source: DesignBoom

Critical Round-Up: The 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist

LSE by O'Donnell and Tuomey

LSE by O’Donnell and Tuomey

 

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has now announced the six projects that form this year’s Stirling Prize Shortlist, the award that is the ultimate prize for any British building. As the RIBA’s most publicly prominent award, the Stirling Prize is often a prime demonstration of the tension between architecture that is widely appreciated by the general populace, and that which is lauded by architectural critics and practitioners.

This year is no exception, with perhaps the country’s highest-profile project in years – the Shard – just part of the controversy. What did the critics make of the RIBA’s selection?

Click HERE to find out.

Written By: Rory Stott

Image Courtesy of: Dennis Gilbert

Source: ArchDaily

Mayor of London Unveils Three Visions for the Future of Heathrow

Romance of the Sky proposal by Hawkins\Brown

Romance of the Sky proposal by Hawkins\Brown

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson has unveiled three proposals to redevelop Heathrow Airport into ‘Heathrow City,’ a new town occupying the site that according to one study “could provide 90,000 jobs and 80,000 homes” in West London. Developed in parallel with Foster + Partners’ proposal to create a new airport in the Thames Estuary, the three possible designs are part of a plan that Johnson believes will not only improve the capital’s aviation capacity, but also the quality of living in the area around the existing Heathrow Airport.

The three proposals, by Rick Mather Architects, Hawkins\Brown and Maccreanor Lavington, all take very different approaches to the brief, which was to create a mixed use residential and commuter town, with a focus on education and technology industries.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Rory Stott

Image Courtesy of: Factory Fifteen

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: Louis Kahn and the Power of Shadow

Kahn Looking at his Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery - image by Lionel Freedman

Kahn Looking at his Tetrahedral Ceiling in the Yale University Art Gallery – image by Lionel Freedman

Does shadow have the power to give form to architecture? The increasing number of transparent buildings and LED installations would enforce the impression that light has eliminated the relevance of shadow. But to answer that question, let’s look back to a master of light whose architecture was shaped by shadow: Louis Kahn.

As identified by Leonardo da Vinci, we often encounter three types of shadows: Attached shadow, shading and cast shadow. The attached shadow falls on the body itself – like a cantilever roof causing a shadow on the façade. The second type belongs to bright and dark contrasts, which are inherent to the form and depend only on the source of light, e.g. a ball shaped pavilion, which even under a cast sky shows a darker zone in the lower part. The third, cast shadow, could be the result of a high house generating shadow on the street due to the projection of the building outline.

Kahn´s archetypical forms go back to Greek architecture, which he studied in the 1950s: “Greek architecture taught me that the column is where the light is not, and the space between is where the light is. It is a matter of no-light, light, no-light, light. A column and a column brings light between them. To make a column which grows out of the wall and which makes its own rhythm of no-light, light, no-light, light: that is the marvel of the artist.”

However, light was also a central element in Kahn´s philosophy because he regarded it as a “giver of all presences”: “All material in nature, the mountains and the streams and the air and we, are made of Light which has been spent, and this crumpled mass called material casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.” For him, light is the maker of material, and material’s purpose is to cast a shadow.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Written By: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Lionel Freedman

Source: ArchDaily

AWA Project Update 2014: Part 1 of 2

Annual update blue header-updated 7 pm

 

July 17th 2014
Vol. 12.1

Dear Friends,

It was 12 years ago this month at our first studio in SoHo, NY that a journey started, with a simple plan- do great work with integrity, innovate, be happy, and pay your bills. It has been an eventful 12 years with very few regrets. We have been fortunate to work across the globe in 22 countries and counting, with great clients and designers on inspiring projects.

At AWA, we are inspired by the following quote from Woodrow Wilson (1919):
“You are not here merely to make a living. You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget that errand.”

Our heartfelt gratitude to all our friends for their support and continuing patronage over the years.

Stay tuned for another exciting project update in two weeks.

Sincerely,

Abhay Wadhwa
AWA Lighting Designers

Click HERE to read the full update.

 

NMMC

NMMC

 

RMGL Fixture

RMGL Fixture

 

Sheraton Park Chennai

Sheraton Park Chennai

 

Lumen Festival Staten Island

Lumen Festival Staten Island