Monthly Archives: June 2014

Barcelona Commemorates 300 Years of Catalan Spirit With 7 Public Installations

Identity by URBANUS

Identity by URBANUS

Every year, citizens of Catalonia commemorate the events of September 11th 1714, a key date in the War of the Spanish Succession that has come to symbolize what Voltaire called “the Barcelonans’ extreme love of freedom.” With this year marking the 300th anniversary of these events, Barcelona Cultura enlisted the Fundació Enric Miralles to curate 7 public installations around the city as part of its Tricentenari BCN program.

The result is BCN RE.SET, organized by Benedetta Tagliabue of the Fundació Enric Miralles and stage director Àlex Ollé, which invited guest architects from countries all over the world to colloborate with local universities and create installations symbolizing 6 political and ideological concepts: identity, freedom, Europe, diversity, democracy and memory. These installations will be in place until September 11th.

Click HERE read the full article.

Written By: Rory Stott

Image Courtesy of: Marcela Grassi

Source: ArchDaily

Hy-Fi, The Organic Mushroom-Brick Tower Opens At MoMA’s PS1 Courtyard

'Hy-Fi' by David Benjamin

‘Hy-Fi’ by David Benjamin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last night, the organic brick structure known as ‘Hy-Fi‘ opened in the courtyard of MoMA’s PS1 space in New York. Designed by David Benjamin of New York architects The Living, the tower was designed as part of MoMA’s Young Architects Program, and its construction centers around the use of an innovative building material: organic, biodegradable bricks consisting of no more than farm waste and a culture of fungus that is grown to fit a brick-shaped mold.

Acting as the centerpiece for MoMA‘s Warm Up music festival on Saturdays throughout the Summer, the temporary structure will provide shade, seating and water until September 7th.

Click HERE read the full article.

Written By: Rory Stott

Image Courtesy of: The Living

Source: ArchDaily

Light Matters: Sacred Spaces

Chapel in Villeaceron, Spain by Sancho-Madridejos Architecture Office

Chapel in Villeaceron, Spain by Sancho-Madridejos Architecture Office

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The use of light can lead to very diverse feelings: a ray of sunlight calls attention; glare overpowers; the nocturnal sky fascinates, while a dense dark forest arouses fear. Religions have made use of these experiences to convey the mystic aspects of their respective deities — accordingly, so too do their erected buildings.

Gottfried Böhm’s Mariendom in Neviges, Germany, encloses the contemplative visitor in a dark environment to focus his attention away from the material world and towards inner enlightenment. The daylight, which enters through small rooflights, only slightly highlights the altar. The concept deliberately plays with adaptation, where the eye slowly adjusts from a bright exterior to darker interior, giving the impression that the environment turns slightly brighter over several minutes.

Peter Zumthor further developed this concept of the dark shelter in the Bruder Klaus Field Chapel, Germany, where the cavity is made from a charred black wooden frame. As a counterpoint, small bottle glass portholes add points of light. Zumthor bases the sensual experience on an intense contrast between daylight and darkness that surprises the visitor. The pilgrims are led from a timid darkness to poetic twinkling stars.

Click HERE read the full article.

Written By: Thomas Schielke

Image Courtesy of: Hisao Suzuki

Source: ArchDaily

2014 MASterworks Awards for Design Excellence in NYC

BRIC Arts Media House and Urban Glass by LEESER Architecture

BRIC Arts Media House and Urban Glass by LEESER Architecture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Municipal Art Society (MAS) of New York announced their list of honorees for the 2014 MASterworks Awards last week. These annual awards are dedicated to buildings, completed the year previously in the city of New York, that exemplify a high standard of design, and make a significant contribution to the city’s urban environment. This year, all of these projects are located outside of the city center and cover a wide range of programming, from an African-American heritage museum, to a pencil factory addition.

Click HERE read ArchDaily’s summary of the awards.

Written By: Connor Walker

Image Courtesy of: MAS NYC

Source: ArchDaily

SKIRA’s Illuminated Shipyard Cranes look like Origami in the Sky

'Lighting Giants' by SKIRA

‘Lighting Giants’ by SKIRA

‘Lighting Giants’ transforms the nocturnal landscape of the Croatian town of Pula, adapting pieces of industrial machinery into a public work of art. The local architectural lighting design studio SKIRA has projected colorful beams of illumination onto the iconic shipyard cranes — characteristic of the seaside city — which have been positioned to look like the folded origami paper versions. The whimsical installation is controlled by a remote system which choreographs its scenography, lit up with more than 16 thousand different color combinations. Shifting from rainbow hues to solid greens, yellows and blues, the mesmerizing show illustrates various colors every hour, for about 15 minutes each time. Presented at the beginning of May at the Visualia Festival, ‘Lighting Giants’ makes creative use of the industrial equipment already situated on the site and brings a sense of fantasy and imagination to the waterfront.

Click HERE to see all the images

Written By: Nina Azzarello

Image Courtesy of: SKIRA

Source: DesignBoom

Naziha Mestaoui Projects Virtual Forests Growing onto Paris’ Monuments

One Beat One Tree by Naziha Mestaoui

One Beat One Tree by Naziha Mestaoui

For the 21st Climate Conference in Paris that will take place in December 2015, Belgian artist Naziha Mestaoui will project ‘One Beat One Tree’ onto the city’s famed monuments. The installation bridges the virtual and the real, technology and nature, as well as what is visible and invisible. Spectators to the artwork are granted the opportunity to create a digital tree that they will be able to see growing on buildings in rhythm with their heart, via a heartbeat sensor controlled through a smartphone. The computerized tree is then actually planted in Europe, Latin America, Africa, or Asia rendering ‘each citizen a co-creator of our collective future beyond individualism,’ expressed the artist.

Click HERE to see all the images

Written By: Nina Azzarello

Source: DesignBoom

Artist transforms derelict underpass with rainbow light installation

Light Rails by Bill FitzGibbons

LightRails by Bill FitzGibbons

Urban renewal of neglected spaces and infrastructure can use many approaches, be it adapting for new uses, or using art to transform places completely. American artist-sculptor Bill FitzGibbons was commissioned by the city of Birmingham, Alabama to alter a derelict and dangerous Art Deco railroad underpass with a vibrant light installation.

Built in 1931, the 18th Street underpass connects downtown Birmingham with a new development called Railroad Park. FitzGibbons’ installation, titled LightRails, consists of thousands of programmed LEDs, capable of millions of different light combinations, that aim to attract pedestrians.

Click HERE to read the full article

Written By: Kimberley Mok

Image Courtesy of: Bill FitzGibbons

Source: Treehugger

Manuelle Gautrand to Revamp Paris’ Alésia Cinema with Hundreds of LED “Pixels”

New Facade for Alesia Cinema by Manuelle Gautrand

New Facade for Alesia Cinema by Manuelle Gautrand

Renovated numerous times during its history, Gaumont-Alésia, a Parisian cinema housed in a structure that is over 80 years old, will now be revamped by firm Manuelle Gautrand Architecture. With a design that emphasizes filmography’s presence in modern culture, the Gaumont-Alésia is set to become an inviting cultural hub for the surrounding city, showcasing cinema’s influence on both the interior and exterior.

Both street facades will be composed of glass curtain walls shaded by pleated metal panels. These panels will be perforated by hundreds of LED “pixels,” which will create an image across the pleats. Both entrances to the building become animated walls, broadcasting film stills, movie trailers, and advertisements, all meant to entice passersby. The LEDs are spaced fewer and farther apart toward the edges of the building, creating a stippling effect around the border of the images. At the entrances these animated panels will peel upwards, creating a canopy under which patrons can walk.

Click HERE to read the full article

Written By: Connor Walker

Image Courtesy of: KDSL

Source: ArchDaily

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk

Columns from 'An Aggregation' series by Seon Ghi Bahk

Columns from ‘An Aggregation’ series by Seon Ghi Bahk

Currently on view at Zadok Gallery in Miami, Fiction of the Fabricated Image is the latest body of work from Seoul-based artist Seon Ghi Bahk. Of particular note is this impressive series of architectural columns constructed from pieces of natural charcoal suspended on nylon threads. The work is part of the artist’s An Aggregation series that explores the complex relationship between nature and humanity, where Bahk suggests “nature” can be incorrectly viewed as simply a backdrop or tool used in the creation of civilization. You can see more over on Zadok Gallery where the installation will be up through August 25, 2014.

Click HERE to see all the images

Written By: Christopher Jobson

Source: Colossal

IAAC Invents a Family of Robots to 3D Print Structures of Any Size

Grip Robot by IAAC

Grip Robot by IAAC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the major challenges in translating 3D Printing technology into architecture has been the issue of scale. So far, this has generally resulted in ever larger printers, with one of the most successful examples being the KamerMaker, which has been used to 3D print a Dutch Canal House in 2x2x3.5 metre chunks. However, recognizing the limitations on the size of 3D printers, the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) has developed a family of three small, mobile robots which together can print a structure of any size.

Click HERE to read the full article

Image courtesy of:  Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia

Written By: Rory Stott

Source: ArchDaily