Streaking Light Pillars Illuminate the Night Sky

The natural phenomenon known as light pillars are making headlines once again due to one photographer’s incredible capture of them one recent cold and late winter night. Photographer Jay Callaghan shot the beautiful photo (above), on his back deck at 1:45 am as he was looking northeast toward Chemong Road in Peterborough, Ontario.

When extreme cold weather hits, ice crystals or tiny discs of ice may form. Usually these ice crystals evaporate before ever reaching the ground. When sunlight or moonlight is reflected on these ice crystals, thin columns that extend vertically above and/or below the source of light are created.

So, how does one explain all of the colors? As the Weather Doctor states, “Because the light rays forming pillars are reflected, they take on the color of the incident light. For example, when the sun is higher in the sky, pillars are white or bright yellow in color. But when it is near the horizon and its light color dominantly orange, gold or red, so is the resulting pillar.”

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Written by: Alice

Source: My Modern Met